6 Reasons You Don’t Have A Job

by Rich DeMatteo on June 21, 2011 · 113 comments

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Many unemployed folks usually don’t understand why they’ve been out of work for so long.  Their obvious scape goat is the economy and the other billion job seekers that are their competition.  This excuse is completely warranted, but I can’t let them off the hook so easy.  It’s just not happening.

Here are 6 reasons why you most likely haven’t found a job yet:

You Don’t Know What You Want

This is brutal.  It’s just absolutely brutal.  If you aren’t clear on the specific opportunity, company, or industry you’re targeting, then you’re setting yourself up for disaster.  A job search without purpose and passion is one that will only lead you on a wild goose hunt.  

Imagine being on a job search site, going through hundreds, if not thousands of postings.  If you don’t know EXACTLY what you want, then you’ll open up most postings, and find yourself unsatisfied with ALL of them.  What also happens is that you may just apply to EVERYTHING, which more so than not means your resume and cover letter are not set up for that specific position.  It’s a poopy sandwich.And you’ll never find your goose.

What to do: Come up with a list of 50 things you want from a job.  Write down characteristics about the industry, benefits, supervisor, salary, skills needed, and many others.  Write down the things that you NEED from a job.  This will help you clear up where you should spend your time looking and how to change up your resume/cover letter to suit that specific type of job.

You Really Don’t Want A Job

Honestly, I’ve been there.  When I was unemployed for 17 months, there was a time when I just didn’t want a job.  Corn on the Job was still growing and I was happy with unemployment and the promise of growing my new blog.  I was lucky, and I’m not proud that I slacked off for a longer period than I should have.

Many people pretend to be looking for work, when really they just feel it’s necessary to half ass and just look casually.  Certain financial situations can call for more laziness in the job search than needed.  No matter how much work they put into their search, if a person doesn’t want a job, then they won’t get one.  Even if they pass an interview, their lack of enthusiasm will halt them at the interview stage.

What to do: Go take a walk downtown and check out the homeless folks.  Not saying this will happen to you, but you’re still employable and they’re not.  Don’t take it for granted.

You Only Use Big Name Job Boards

Using a big name job board is OK, and many people find work from them.  The problem here is that EVERYONE is using them.  Employers are bombarded with resumes from a single posting and you may never be found.  If your only source of searching for a job is one of the more well known sites, then you’re in trouble.

What to do: Start using a niche website for your industry.  Try out the Linkedin job boards.  Network.  Make personal business cards and drop them in random places.  Just add more strategies to your search.  It’s more work, but it’s needed.

You Have a Poor Resume/Cover Letter

The format sucks.  It’s tough to read.  Grammar is disgusting.  Too much color.  No clear purpose.

Readers of your job search communications can’t identify what you’re looking to do, what makes you the shiznit, and most importantly, why they should hire you.

What to do: Hire me!  I’ll take your existing resume/cover letter and totally make it what they WANT to read!

You Don’t Interview Well

Whether it’s the phone screen or in person interview, many job seekers don’t live up to their full potential when it comes to an interview.  Whether it’s just nerves, not being able to sell oneself, or something else, it’s very common that the most skilled person for the job doesn’t always land the job.  If you happen to be the most skilled person for the job, you should damn well be hired for it.  If you feel this is happening often, then you might need to look into developing your interviewing skills.

What to do: Hey there, you can hire me!  I’ll set up a mock phone interview with you so that we can practice interviewing together.  I’ll act as the company you want to work for, and I’ll ask questions that I think they’ll be targeting.  When we’re done, you and I will talk about what you did good and bad, then look for ways to improve.

You Don’t Know Anyone

It really is like you’ve heard.  It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.  Shit, I hate writing that just about as much as I hate hearing it, but it’s true.

In our world today, you should make networking a constant part of your job search.  Too many people are out of work, and unless you’re an employee referral, a recruiter might not even give you a 5 second phone call.

What to do: Whether it’s online through Linkedin, Twitter, Facebook, or other social networking sites, or through live networking, spend a few hours a week simply networking and getting the word out about your unemployment.

 

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105 comments
Sharon Hill
Sharon Hill

I wholeheartedly agree with all that you've said here, but there's one thing that's left out - or perhaps is an offshoot of the "you really don't want one" syndrome. It may sound harsh, but some people are just too lazy or at best too much of a procrastinator to respond to a job opportunity in the timely manner it takes to get a jump on the other candidates. I can't tell you how many times friends or associates have come to me with help getting started as freelance writers or just job hunting and know I have been in the world of recruitment for a long time. I've given them advice about social networking as part of a job hunt, about showcasing their expertise with a blog or LinkedIN profile, about smaller more nichy job search sites, and about the various sources for unpublished writers to get their start. In two cases I asked two of my good professional friends - one a career counselor, the other a long time call center executive - to help these people by phone. Both of these nice professional friends immediately said sure they'd help. Neither of the candidates followed through: The old "yeah, I really should do that" syndrome. You can hear the "but." In one case, the candidate came back to me three weeks later, said "I haven't had a chance to call her yet. Would you mind letting her know I will soon?" I told him yes, I would mind. He never contacted her. In about 90% of the cases in which someone asked for my help and got it, she or he never followed through on the advice and the resources I gave. I know, not everyone is that way, but I've seen it so often that I can't help but think that some people just don't have the ambition to go the extra mile it takes to make themselves stand out as a candidate. Additionally, I think job seekers MUST realize that most jobs are not posted, and some are even created for the right candidate. My last two jobs were created for me, because I was able to convince them not only that I was right for the company but that I wanted to work for their company first and foremost. Job seekers MUST determine for whom they want to work, and what they want to do, and not be deterred by the fact that the company is not stated publicly that it is hiring. They MUST use the social network tools for recruiting, such as LinkedIN, Facebook / Monster's BeKnown Facebook app, and sites such as Jobfox, JobVite, TwitJobSearch, Indeed.com, SimplyHired and others that allow them to synch their social presence and find out which of their social friends is connected to the company for whom they want to work. They must determine what their dream job is, who it is with, and put their best foot forward in front of that company long before any job goes up online. Without doing that - with just going through the apply for the jobs that are posted process - they might eventually find some job somewhere, but they probably won't find what they want, what they'll excel at and what they'll stay with long enough to provide a satisying career and lucrative retirement.

Tamara
Tamara

I think you should add that in your live networking you should volunteer. I've decided to volunteer at my daughter's school because I figure that at some point if there isn't a position that opens up at the school then someone will know someone who's hiring and can pass that on to me. Plus, it's more experience to add to my resume...or is that not ok to add volunteer experience on a resume?

Jobs in South Africa
Jobs in South Africa

Rich, bold and daring statements of the unemployed. Most of it is nail on the head. People are generally so laid back when they don't have a job. Getting into the proactive habit of finding a job is a lot of hard work, physically and mentally.

Susan
Susan

At first glance, one can nod and agree with all these. But I have to say I disagree with the "You Really Don't Want A Job" argument in the case of a few people I know who have excellent resumes, good interviews, and solid professional backgrounds who simply can't get hired. I do get that you're not saying all of these six reasons apply to everyone who's unemployed, however.

Kenneth R. Thompson
Kenneth R. Thompson

Job. Job. Job. Job...I sent my resume and filled applications for a combined total of 547 times. I am was done with it. I tried offering my services 6 weeks, no pay-just to prove myself. I am a licensed electrician, an engineering student, I have a IQ 162. Truth is, there is nothing out there that I can not learn fluently, in an expediant manner. That's my problem? Too smart to work for someone else? I've been told that but hey-I have offered my services for 6 weeks free of charge. I have an uncanny ability to learn very quickly. I have had people tell me that to some, because of this ability, I am a threat. HELL, I have applied to flip burgers and clean tables at McDonalds and Dairy Queen. The manager at McDonalds took a look at my application and I qoute, "Oh, gosh no". I am not an criminal, I have never been convicted, I have been fired from one job because I absolutely refused to endanger my life by standing on top of a 30ft. scizzor lift above solid concrete without a safety harness ( I would refuse today). Under the reason for termination, it stated that I refused to perform routine functions of the job. Fortunately, I am blessed with an above average brain. But, it's really not my brain is above average-I just cannot stand to NOT to know how to do something, or NOT know something, what ever something may be. I refuse to keep ignorance as an option. If I don't know it now, I will know it soon. We all have a degree of ignorance regarding something, or in some subject(s). The definition of ignorance means nothing more than to be lacking in knowledge. The ONLY path to independence and sustainability is knowledge and the experiences that one has while in the pursuit of knowledge instills wisdom. I began designing-then I later started building-and now, I have business. If it were not for all of my experiences and my unrelenting pursuit of knowing and understanding, I would be still be hunting for a job. TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR OWN DESTINY.

Beth Anne
Beth Anne

Okay so how do you "network" when you've moved to a new city and know absolutely no one? What are some smaller job sites to look on? I've tried to use Craigslist but I feel all I find is work at home gigs or internet scams :( I've tried LinkEd but all those jobs aren't in my area :(

Leadership Development
Leadership Development

These are perfect reasons why one does not get a job. Very good article. Would love to hear more from you.

Rod Dailey
Rod Dailey

Rich, I was pointed to your blog from LinkedIn. The things you covered is spot on. I just finished a military career. I have a MA in HR. I am currently in Professional Development to assess my strengths and skills. I did see anything wrong with your post. Job well done!!!! The truth hurts..

Fred Z
Fred Z

Guess what happened when I created a younger less skilled version of me who has only been out of work for 3 months instead of almost 3 years?

Holley Kahn
Holley Kahn

As a recruiter I see many unemployed people commit these mistakes especially the last 3. There are things as job seekers that I think you are unaware of and Rich was just trying to make sure you knew. 1 - Your resume and cover letter should be customized for each job you apply to. Do all job seekers take the time to do that? If not then you aren't doing everything you can do to help yourself. 2 - Do you take time to practice interviewing? Do you research the company? Do you write down questions to ask the person who interviews you? Do you write down your answers to practice questions so that you will be prepared. Most people probably do not. 3 - Do you network as much as you can. Everyone should be on linkedin. You should attend networking groups. It may even be a good idea to take a position making less than what you think you should just to meet and network with other people to hopefully find a job within your field. These are the things that I think Rich is trying to say. If you are doing all of these then great job!!! This article isn't for you so don't take it so personally. If you are not doing these things then do some research on what Rich is saying. He's just trying to help. I think we are all being a little hard on Rich.

Marcus Varner
Marcus Varner

Love the direct approach. I've been unemployed for extended periods of time before and it was really easy to feel sorry for myself. That's the victim that we all like to play when things are tough and that's really what separates the people who took offense at this post from those who took it for what it is. The truth cuts sometimes, but only enough to remove the infection. Your recommendations are sound. Anyone who can't accept them just doesn't want it bad enough. Here's a great article we put up about overcoming those mental roadblocks: http://www.yellowbrickroad.com/follow/4-ways-to-overcome-obstacles/

AG
AG

Thoroughly enjoyed the post and concur with your "takes." I would add "You Don't Ask For Help." This falls into your thought on - 'You Don't Know Anyone' but for jobseekers they have to go mix it up with people. If they show up, they will get help without having to ask for it.

MeliMoore
MeliMoore

Fantastic post Rich. A successful job search will have a multi-pronged approach and you give wise advice. Simply sending resumes will not optimize your chances of securing an interview. Networking, by itself, will not optimize your chances of securing an interview. Many, many job seekers do not realize this and you do everyone a service by outlining this in a bold and easy-to-read post. I work with the unemployed and underemployed on a daily basis and while I can certainly say that many are victims of circumstance there are certainly more than enough people that have remained unemployed for long periods that make little effort and expect big results. Many newly unemployed do not understand how to work a job search. I find this especially true in the older age groups who (at least in our area) were the hardest hit with layoffs. The art of the job search has changed tremendously in the past few years with the onset of social media. Rich offers fantastic and relevant advice for the 21st century job seeker. Rich - stop apologizing.

Laura Vezer
Laura Vezer

Wowie! What a conversation you have going here. Related to your first point - it's just as important to know what you DON'T want in a job. If you don't know what you DO want, make a list of what you DON'T want - that will at the very least help steer clear of what won't make you happy at work. Second point - there are a lot of people in the world who are not trying hard enough to get work. A lot of people do try hard - and succeed in creating their own success by finding a company to work for, or invoking their entrepreneurial spirit - I had a friend who was out of work, but crocheted hats and scarves and gloves, and napkin holders, to sell at a market when times got tough. When I was out of work I flipped burgers at a BBQ restaurant, and sold candles at a flea market - whatever I could do to make a dime to get back home. I know other people who try to get laid off in the cooler months so they can collect unemployment while they go skiing. It's subjective, and up to the reader to look deep into their own hearts and ask the question "am I doing everything I can to find a job?" You can't answer that for them, you can only lead them to the question itself. I remember a wise person once shared a quote with me - it goes something like this: 'When there are sufficient resources to meet our "wants", we re-define our "wants" as "needs" and in some cases "entitlements". When this happens we keep raising the bar as to what we are entitled to.' Hopefully some of your readers will find value in this. Keep it up, Rich. Your blogs are always thought provoking and in my opinion, valuable.

Izzy Presley
Izzy Presley

you have obviously read my cover letter ....

Tracy Brisson
Tracy Brisson

Rich- Wow. I absolutely don't understand how someone thinks it's okay to go on this site that supports your business, that features content that is created by your love, sweat, expert knowledge and tears, and attack you for featuring services that cost money. Flabbergasted. Why shouldn't you get paid for your time and expertise? I know you want to be responsive to your readers, but please don't be defensive about it. People should be grateful that you give any advice free- because it's good and if they sat down with a notebook, made this a checklist, and wrote down notes on what they could do better on each item, they'd be so much closer to a job. People don't feel comfortable talking about money and selling- it's become taboo because of people throwing around phrases like "adding value." Those people who created those phrases are making millions because they don't give their stuff away for free and don't pretend they do. No one should expect altruism when it comes to their professional life. That mindset change is critical. As for the homeless thing, I understand exactly what you meant. I've been honest with you via email and my guest blog post for Job Hunt Chat about what a struggle it was to launch my business and about 4 months ago, I was at my financial wits end because of some work that had fallen through. For the first time of 15 years of being on my own, I didn't know how I was going to pay my rent (thankfully that didn't happen because I focused on your #6). I found myself crying on the couch of a good friend and she helped me realize there is a big difference from being short a few months cash/rent and being on the street with no one in your life to help, no possessions, and no idea of how to navigate government services. Really knowing how far away you are from permanent homelessness can help you focus on the assets you do have (knowledge, skills, experience) and focus on using them to get where you want. It's not something to take for granted. Reading the comments, I think you should add another reason, which is applying for the wrong jobs. When the economy tanked, the types of jobs created changed but not all job seekers changed their strategy. Keep doing your thing!

Gary
Gary

The one question I guess I have is how Behavioral Interview questions determine how you can do the job you are applying for. I went to one yesterday and the girl, who can be as old as my daughter with a streak of orange in her hair, asked me a half dozen behavioral question for an assembly job. Nothing about how good are you with your hands, can you assemble, what tools do you use, but something like what would you want to do if you had a choice of any job in the world or what are your short term and long term goals. So the question I have is this: how will these question make the company know how I can do the job? Some one may ace the behavioral Interview but may be terrible at assembly as opposed to someone who does not do good on the questions may be the best assembler in the world. I think that is why there are so many jobs going unfilled because we have kids asking stupid questions and making determinations on the question that have nothing to do with the job that is available.

Nick C.
Nick C.

Interesting post to say the least. Looks like you really shook the beehive Rich. As someone who was unemployed for 16 months myself I felt it necessary to postin your defense. When I was un-employed, I learned some things. Things like, living outside of means. I feel that a lot of your reader-base falls into this category. The tradition of having a mortgage on a house is nothing new, but it's wrong. Just because you can borrow money from someone doesn't mean you can afford x. I'd bet money that most of the people posting here have mortgages and savings that could only sustain them 6 months leaving them in the situations they arrive. Most americans are 10-15k in debt excluding their mortgage. The key is to not live outside your means EVEN IF you are employed and to diversify your sources of income if married. (don't work at the same place, don't invest in one stock, learn a skill that you can apply if in a difficult situation) Oh and one more thing, your not too good to do any job when you have no money. Just because you are MBA from X doesn't mean you should overlook something you might feel is beneath you. Cobra only lasts so long and most employers will discriminate based on whether or not your currently employed. Don't give them a reason to.

Bryan Wempen
Bryan Wempen

Rich, I felt the post was good. You even acknowledged there might be a couple of hard-edges around the homeless part but the point in context of "don't think this can't happen to you" is all relative to how bad it can get for some people. Below is an article from a career coach in Tulsa of which I felt it was worth sharing.. http://ow.ly/5pNCN In the article Teri makes mention of issues with substance abuse in her conversation which is a big factor with a large population of those battling homelessness right along with mental illness, that is probably the only unfair comparative relative to a career move and employability. Moving on...one of the biggest "excuses" I see quite frequently from people who say they're stuck in their situation is they won't change the situation. This could be as simple as sucking it up and starting at entry-level to learn new skills, knowledge, etc. all the way to an unwillingness to relocate to a place that has more opportunities. Really, the conversation around this subject went like this: "Been out of work for 8 months, no jobs... ~Why don't you move to the southern part of the state, new plant opening they can't find enough people. ~I can't move.... ~Why "can't" you? ~My family are here. ~Ok, is your family can visit and you can visit them. ~No, I can't.... ~Actually, no you "won't"......" Reality is that many people fall into the victim role and confuse "I can't" not realizing it's more accurately "I won't". We all have our "I wont's" I just make sure they're less and less versus the "I can", "I will" and "I did"! Again, great thought provoking article that I wouldn't change a word of it....! Hope you're doing great...

patrick mclaughlin
patrick mclaughlin

Wow. Stirred up a hornet's nest, Cornz. Think about it this way. Everybody fundamentally wants to be recognized as productive and useful despite any and all circumstances. If you can help people realize their potential and point them in a better direction, you are performing a great service. Never apologize for reimbursement for your time and never apologize for trying to help. I've been doing it for 23 years. You'll never make everyone happy, but you'll remember the victories and you will be remembered.

Benjamin
Benjamin

I think a lot of people are taking your remarks too seriously. That tends to happen when someone hits close to home. I know what it is like to put my foot in my mouth. I'm pretty sure most people do, so let's hope everyone can be forgiving and more understanding of what your true intentions were with your message.

Jen
Jen

Whatever, I don't even have time to read all this whining. I can't disagree with anything that Rich wrote in this post. Sometimes the truth is just a hard pill to swallow. I've been both homeless and unemployed neither ever for long because I get off my butt and do something about the situation. Take a job anywhere making anything. At least you can honestly say you tried. Sitting on your computer and attacking people who are actually doing something, just makes you look like a jerk. Essentially, if you are not where you want to be, then it is because you haven't gotten yourself there. I am so sick of everyone blaming the economy for everything. Its an easy scapegoat I suppose, but if you sit back and think about it, it all can't be due to the economy.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hi Sharon - thanks so much for the comment! I think you are right in your addition and I hope people read your comment to gain the insight!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Susan - Thanks for the comment! Well, yes, what I meant from this post is that ONE of these reasons may apply to someone. If someone fits in ONE of these reasons, then that is why they aren't getting a job. If ANY ONE of these exist, then t hey probably will have trouble finding work.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Kenneth - Thanks for the lengthy comment and story. Wow, you certainly have gone through an interesting search. 547 times is exhausting and I'm glad you have persisted. Congratulations on your business!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Beth Anne - When you move to a new city, you can use Linkedin or find live networking groups. You can use Twitter to search out recruiters from that area that work at staffing firms. It's very simple, just takes some brainstorming and elbow grease. Let me know how it goes.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Rod - Thanks for your comment. I'm happy you felt everything here was spot on, and I'm also glad to see you're currently assessing your skills. Let me know how it goes and what ends up happening please!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Fred - did you get a job? Did you lie on your resume? What happened?

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Holley - Thanks for the comment and support. Maybe people were a bit hard, but I really pushed the boundaries here. I did expect some harsh comments back, but I think people took it harder than I thought they would. Glad as a recruiter you see what I'm trying to get at! Thanks again!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Marcus - Thanks for the comment. I'm glad you took it that I was trying to help in this post, because that is ALWAYS my intention. I like how you worded it, "The truth cuts sometimes, but only enough to remove the infection." Rather brilliant! Rich

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Once again, wasn't meant to offend, and we all know it can happen to anyone. I do believe MOST people have made decisions in their life (either many years before or recently) that have led to them being unemployed and eventually homeless. It can happen to anyone, but people should always be prepared for the worst and look for ways to combat the worst scenario if it should happen. I wish you the best and I offer my help if you need it. Just ask if you need any counseling.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Thanks AG - agree on the "not asking for help" addition. That's huge, and while many people think they know everything, simply asking a few questions will show them it's not so.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Thanks for this Melissa! Your comment about the newly unemployed are having a tough time in the new job search. I agree completely. I would think that maybe a little research would help them, but more focused counseling is probably what they need. So, for offering my help, which I should be paid for, I will certainly stop apologizing! Thanks for the support!

Laura Vezer
Laura Vezer

I wish there was a like function to these comments - well said Meli!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Laura - Thanks for the comment here! Good point about knowing what you Don't want. I agree. Thanks for sharing the quote and your story of what you did when you were out of work yourself! Thanks for your encouragement as well!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Tracey, thanks for the comment and encouragement! I felt exactly like you, there are tons of tidbits here for free. They are easy to find, and in the time it took people to piss and moan about my choice of words, they could have found free help. Thanks for being honest about your situation. I too went through a time of unemployment and it was hard. I also went through most of the reasons I outlined. I've been there and I know how it feels to be stuck in that net.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Gary - thanks for the comment and question. If you email me, I can help you out more. My email is CornOnTheJob @ gmail DOT com Here's my response... Behavioral Interview Questions are the best predictor of future performance on the job. That's why we interview right? To figure out how someone will perform on the job. How does BI work? BI questions ask you to talk about specific examples from previous work situations. Rather than asking you, "Can you do this?" (which is open to lying, short answers, and little detail), the interviewer asks, "Tell me about a time when this happened. What did you do?" (which opens it up, and gives you a clear path to talk about how you reacted in that situation. Behavioral Interviewing is not stupid, but there must also be a technical interview. Typically on a longer phone screen or another part of the in-person interview. There has to be a section where the candidate is screened on their technical ability, to go along with their behavioral interview. And, asking you about your short and long term goals really isn't behavioral interviewing. Neither is asking about which job you could have if you could choose it. Those are just questions to assess your focus and goals. If you need more help, just email me. Thanks

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Thanks for the comment, Nick. Your point at the bottom really hits home for me. Honestly, doing something "below" ones skill set, could open up a ton of doors and even show someone something they had no idea existed. Thanks!

Marty
Marty

This is a well thought out response and is the truth of why not finding a job is so painful for people. The world changed and most Americans couldn't take their eyes off American Idol for 5 minutes to realize it and adapt. Nick many people are learning these hard lessons...the hard way unfortunately and it is tough out there no doubt, but too many blame others before looking at themselves and the decisions that they made over the years. Great response Nick. Rich- keep up the good work

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Bryan - Thanks for your comment and passing along Teri's article. I agree completely. People seem to be unwilling to do what's needed. SOMETIMES I feel there is a sense of entitlement from folks. Thanks!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Pat - thanks for the comment. I can't please everyone, and my time is worth something. I apologize if I've offended anyone, but I won't apologize for offering my help and time, which is worth something. Thanks!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hi Benjamin - Thanks for your thoughts. Yes, my true intentions were to be helpful with tough love. That hasn't been received well, and that's OK. It was sort of expected. Thanks!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Jen - Thanks for your comments. I appreciate your thoughts, support, and attitude here. I wanted more people to look at it like you, but I understand that's not realistic. I can't please everyone, and I knew that when I wrote this piece. Many people fall into these 6 categories, but many do not. The people that do fall into these categories need to work a bit harder and look for new ways to reach out to employers. Thanks.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Janet - Thanks for your thoughts and comments. I've made it clear that blaming the economy is warranted and that these 6 reasons are not the only reasons. These are just 6 reasons that you are out of work. People need to realize that this is a kick in the pants and if they fall into one of these 6 categories, then it's time to work on changing things. I believe the post is great as it is. It leaves helpful tips on each, and it also points credit to me, which it should. I've helped many people prepare for interviews and tidy up their resumes. There's no way I can discuss what someone needs to do on both of these without working with them 1 on 1. Also, I know of that story. That's a one in a million story. He also lost the job he got and is now in rehab for his drug use. Not everyone has a golden voice or an opportunity like that. He was very lucky. But blew his opportunity.

Fred Z
Fred Z

"I do believe MOST people have made decisions in their life (either many years before or recently) that have led to them being unemployed." MOST PEOPLE? Really? I guess the bad decision I made was living too damn long.

Fred Z
Fred Z

You got that right. lol

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Thanks for the follow-up here, Marty. And thanks for the encouragement. All this post asks folks to do is to take a look at themselves. If they fall in one of these 6 reasons, then they can change and improve. That's all I tried to do here. Thanks!

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  1. [...] 6 Reasons You Don't Have A Job Imagine being on a job search site, going through hundreds, if not thousands of postings. If you don't know EXACTLY what you want, then you'll open up most postings, and find yourself unsatisfied with ALL of them. someone can spend 10-15 hours a week instead of 40 on their job search Reply. Orchote June 21, 2011 at 08:45 pm. One big commercial for yourself. Really? Two thirds of the advice you gave here (if you can call it that) was to give you money [...]

  2. [...] Corn on the Job: 6 Reasons You Don’t Have a Job [...]

  3. [...] “6 Reasons You Don’t Have a Job” wasn’t meant to offend anyone.  But it did.  Holy shit, it certainly did. [...]

  4. [...] Rich DeMatteo caused quite a stir over on his site, Corn on the Job, when he doled out some tough job-seeking love in his post 6 Reasons You Don’t Have A Job [...]

  5. [...] sources on job hunting/searching, Corn on the Job, aka Rich DeMatteo. He wrote a post called “6 Reasons You Don’t Have a Job” (go read it now, and come back here) and I completely connected and related to it, almost [...]

  6. [...] to this article, I may not have a job (or in my case,  any other freelance work) for six reasons. This made me [...]

  7. [...] First of all – peep this post the other day by @cornonthejob outlining why he thinks job seekers are having problems – “6 Reasons You Don’t Have A Job” [...]