Your recruiter <3's you

by Rich DeMatteo on January 20, 2010 · 1 comment

4 Flares 4 Flares ×
Turn on Charm EY

Photo Credit - Eric Yeager

Have a bit of interview anxiety?  Here’s a quick tip – your recruiter is pulling for you.

While most places aren’t hiring in bulk like they used to, recruiting/staffing has been cut back, which doubles, or even triples the work load a recruiter has on their plate.  When someone calls about your resume, it’s because you look the part on paper and they are hoping you are the part. This should instill some confidence in you.

After passing the phone screen and scheduling a face-to-face interview, you best believe the hiring team is excited and wants you to be the one.  Sure, this doesn’t mean you are a lock for the job, but up until this point they are loving your stuff, so try to smile, relax, and then charm the shit out of your interviewer(s).

Stay positive through out the process, a negative attitude will only cause setbacks.  I read a post from Nicole Crimaldi yesterday on using the Law of Attraction to attain your goals.  It is a great post on the power of positive thought, and I’m a 100% believer in how a positive attitude and positive thought becomes who you are.  BELIEVE that you are the best fit for the position and KNOW that you will perform wonderfully on the interview.  You might find yourself surprised to see how much better you interview once setting your attitude straight.

One last thing.  Just because your recruiter may <3 you, this doesn’t give you the right to act like their best friend.  Stay professional, and keep your personal distance them until you gain co-worker status.  Sarah White urges you to quit being so nice, and stop e-mailing her pictures of cute kitties.  Just because we are your recruiter, it doesn’t mean you can Facebook us, or send “What’s up?” e-mails our way.  Doing that will be creepy, and we won’t be pulling for you anymore.

Got it?

Photo Credit – Eric Yeager

Recruiters: Do you agree with me?  Have a funny/creepy story to share about candidates being too nice/weird?  Think I’m a jackass?  Whatever you’re thinking, I’d like to know.

Job Seekers: What helps with your interview stress/anxiety?  Ever do something nice for your recruiter before or after being hired?

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
23 comments
Ariel Hernandez
Ariel Hernandez

I recently went to an agency to find a job that matched my skills. The recruiter was very on it in getting me in at  interviews, and what I thought was very strange was that she started to text me about the jobs and interviews. I felt she should've contacted me by email or phone the whole time, like other agencies. She told me she would set up early appointments since it worked well with my schedule, but then she set them up in the middle of the day as my shift at work had just started. I had gave her the pay range I was looking for, but all she set me up with were interviews who paid much less. I still went to the interviews so I could have some options, and there was one where I just wanted to leave as soon as I got there since I didn't like what I had seen, but didn't want to be on bad terms with the recruiter or give her a bad reputation. After seeing the places she had gotten me interviews at, I applied to a company on my own and had been offered the job the next day. I mentioned this to the recruiter and the next day she said she had an interview with an awesome company with an unbelievable pay and that the HR Director really wanted to meet me before I took the job somewhere else. I showed up to the interview, and the job was way less than what the recruiter mentioned to me, and the HR Director didn't seem that interested, even the position she said it would be for was much different. I wasn't sure why she would lie and push me to go to the interview if it wasn't anything like she described. I really liked her, but after I had gotten job offers on my own, she became pushy. It had me wondering if she made any money based on me showing up to the interviews.


On the other hand, the company who I got the job with, had a very nice recruiter. She responded to my assesment scores a week later and contacted me over the phone. She asked me questions about my previous employers and pay rate. She then set me up with an interview within the next two days, and after the interview I asked her for both interviewers' emails to thank them. I emailed the interviewers within the next day and didn't get a response, but did get a call from the recruiter saying I got the job! 

Elisa
Elisa

When I am in my recruiting/hiring duties, I am uber competitive. If you get past me on the screen and phone interview, you've been through the ringer. Candidates have told me many a time I'm fair and kind, but tough. So by the time they make it to the interview table with other candidates you best believe I'm pulling for them. Partly because I want them on board with us. Partly the pride of finding a great candidate. But mostly cause I like to win. When I was job seeking, I definitely did the handwritten thank you note. I know not everyone recommends this or even believes in it, but I am a firm believer in it. To minimize my stress, I looked internally to figure out where my stress was coming from. It was that I was applying in a field I had little experience but wanted to be in, I was young, and I didn't know everything (which is an issue for me...I'm a very analytical person.) So I researched the company's website for about 3 hours, printed out some pertinent/interesting pages, brought recommendation letters with me for everyone and pretended like I had any idea what was going on. Good news...they bought it and were so impressed that I researche their company I had a call at the end of the day offering me the job.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Elisa - Thanks for telling me your reasons for being "fair and kind, but tough". Coming out with a placement is a great feeling. And on thank you notes - I'm kind of torn. A hand written note will never hurt, but if a candidate doesn't send one at all, then I'm OK with it if they are the best candidate. I'll still hire someone if they don't send me any form of a thank you. The company research is a must. You sound like a great candidate and one that impresses any company you interview for!

Srinivas Rao
Srinivas Rao

Really smart ideas as always Rich. Like I told you yesterday I think you could do an entire series on conversations with recruiters. While I think it's weird to send your recruiter messages on Facebook and things like that, I do make a point to go and learn a bit about my recruiter. I'll usually Google them, look for them on Linkedin and more. I'll sometimes bring up something related to their background in initial conversations because I think that if it comes from a place of genuine curiosity, people actually like that. That's my two cents :)

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Srini - I agree and disagree. It is good to know their background, but don't be creepy about it. Recruiters (agency and corporate) don't want to have a long call with you. While they like what you can offer, they aren't trying to be your buddy. While they are pulling for you, you shouldn't be talking about sports or anything off the topic of the job. Besides, if you bring up anything not related to the job, there can be risk of bringing up certain discriminatory areas like family, religion, age...etc

Scott Hale
Scott Hale

People usually have a really difficult time viewing situations from any standpoint other than their own - and as you have hit on in this post, their are differences in the thought-patterns of employers and potential employees. While being interviewed, it's damn near impossible to think the person on the other side of the desk is in your corner. So, thank you for posting this. To your other point about being friendly with recruiters - use some common sense. While I'm not a recruiter, I don't mind maintaining a friendly (yet professional) relationship with a recruiter. Some lines shouldn't be crossed, but some personality should shine through. I'd be interested to see some more of your thoughts on the line between professional with personality vs. too friendly. Thanks, - Scott

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Scott - thanks for adding in your thoughts. It is certainly tough to see the other person interviewing you as your buddy, and well, sometimes they aren't. Your recruiter, the corporate recruiter who found you wants you to succeed. When you are meeting the Hiring Manager, it may be a different scenario. They will obviously be closely scrutinizing every word to make sure you are a fit before green lighting you through. I also despise interviews in which a square table is used and people sit on opposite sides. I'm much more in favor of a circular table and sitting next to the candidate. Makes them feel much more welcomed. In regards to being unprofessional or too friendly - I think there is definitely a line. Thank them for contacting you, thank them their time, but never call them "buddy" or "Pal". Stick to their first names. One time I had a candidate send me pictures of his newborn baby and his wife at the hospital. This was a candidate that I met once, and was preparing to send over to my client. Even though it freaked me out, I still sent him over because he was a good fit for the job. I made sure to tell him to NOT send that to my client manager. If I had been a corporate recruiter at that time and hiring for my own company, I would have pulled the plug. Don't make your recruiter your best friend, let it be professional. Share a few jokes, feel free to show personality and charm, but don't go face book stalking and playing farmville with the recruiter.

Jason Davis
Jason Davis

Rich - as usual, COTJ delivers a witty, fresh perspective with great advice and no fluff. I'd like to point out that there is not ONE buzzword in this post. Well done. I also totally agree - it's one of the attractive things about being in recruiting - you get to get people great jobs, and you get to get your company great people. You better believe recruiters are pulling for rockstar candidates, they need to close those open reqs!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Jason - Buzz words can confuse me, or maybe I don't understand their hype - so I stay away. I always loved crossing off a job on the white-board. Knowing something is "done" is a great feeling, and mentally crossing it out was always nice too.

Royce
Royce

I have zero experience with recruiters so on that basis alone this was an interesting read. I personally view me joining a company as a big benefit for that company (they are pretty lucky to have me), so I do agree that there's no reason to sweat it at an interview. I also ask a ton of questions of my interviewers because I want to know what it will be like to work for/with them. You know I love Nicole's posts and really enjoy her site, but speaking sarcastically I really liked when that same idea she wrote about was called "The Secret" and Oprah was raving about it. Cause wasn't that basically the same thing?

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

There is the attitude I want - "they are pretty lucky to have me" - awesome, Royce! I always respect and like when candidates ask prepared, well thought out questions. I don't watch Oprah, so I can't comment on that! :o)

Nicole Crimaldi
Nicole Crimaldi

PS- Do most job candidates understand how the recruiting business works? Sometimes I think if they understood that recruiters only get paid above a living wage when they make placements. This might change a lot of job-seekers perspectives and calm some nerves. PPS- Love that you use <3 as if it were a real word (um, because it is in my dictionary)

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Glad you brought up Recruiter Pay. When it is an agency recruiter, they do make some big bucks when they place candidates. The corporate recruiters may get a bonus for meeting placement goals, but usually are just paid a salary like everyone else. oh and I will drop

Nicole Crimaldi
Nicole Crimaldi

On the note of thinking positively when it comes to your career... I was once at a women's entrepreneurship event when the national director of a huge company suggested that we "fake it until we make it." At first I was irritated and thought this lady was implying we should become fake & cheesy Barbies. That's not what she meant at all. If YOU don't act the part, look the part, and believe you can handle the part- why would anyone else? Positive thinking in this case goes hand in hand with confidence, which is absolutely contagious! Although you may be uncomfortable in the first few minutes of the interview, a bit of "fake it till you make it" will have you being your real, capable self in no time.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Great story here, Nicole. The first boss I had in my life was, and still is one of my biggest mentors. He's been through many challenging situations in life and has really been given the shit end of the stick. He's remained successful and has done well for himself in his career through all of this. He always told me, "Rich, I fake happy everyday and I make the best of any situation". Hearing that he had to "fake happy" everyday was sort of sad for me to hear, but you could never tell he might have been faking. HIs positive attitude did make him happier, and brought him success. He also said that he always acted like he knew what he was doing, even if he didn't. The lessons he taught me always stay with me, and I feel you sort of learned a similar lesson from that national director.

Beth
Beth

Interesting post! I definitely have also experienced the "positive thinking power" and think it just makes you convey yourself as a more likable person. Another thing I have noticed is that there is a fine line between being active in your search and harassing the recruiter. At one point in our lives, maybe we all experience both. Great ideas!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Beth - Look at anyone who has a negative attitude about themselves, or even says self defeating comments. They usually aren't fun to be around, aren't happy, and are not setting themselves up for success. I always say to send a recruiter one message every week or two. If you don't hear back for 2- 3 weeks then maybe it is time to move on.

Jonathan Hyland
Jonathan Hyland

I'm a little skeptical about the "Law" of Attraction - sorry, it's the scientist in me. However, I do see merit in what it implies: keeping positive about your situation ultimately benefits you. I think keeping positive throughout your job search - especially if you're working with a recruiter - says a lot about you. It shows you can persevere through even the hardest of times, and that's a pretty desirable quality for any employer to look for in an employee. I also happen to think it's important, when working with a recruiter, to vet the recruiter on your own. Make sure you're working with the right person who understands you, your skill set, and where you want to be. Just don't send them chain letters. Thanks Rich!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Jonathan - I feel positive thought no matter what can not hurt. Sure, there is no scientific prof to the law of attraction, but when you think you can do something or are something, I feel you are more in tuned to your surroundings regarding whatever it is. I agree with you on the recruiter point, but many times you can not choose your recruiter. This is the case when you are working with a corporate recruiter that works for the company you are applying to. You may have more room with agency recruiting, but no so much when you apply in directly to a company. Thanks for your thoughts!

Tammy Colson
Tammy Colson

Just this morning I had a former employee call me at 6am to ask for his job back. It was a no before he called, but at 6am, it was a "you must be out of your mind!" Always enjoy your posts, Rich!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Oh Tammy, 6AM is too early for a candidate call, but it seems any time wouldn't have been the right time for this former employee! Thanks, Tammy!

Sarah White
Sarah White

Rich - As usual, a great post! I can't agree with you more - there is nothing that I loved better (when I was still recruiting) than my candidate getting the job. I was their biggest cheerleader and supporter because, lets face it, its my job to bring in the best and if they get hired its because I do my job well. But, that doesn't mean that we are best friends or that you should treat me like the girl from 7rh grade you just reunited with on facebook. Until you are hired - I am still evaluating everything you do - don't get creepy.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Thanks, Sarah. As recruiters we are measured on the quality of candidate and time to hire (among other things). This feeling of