Let’s have a toast for the douche bags. Let’s have a toast for the recruiters.

by Rich DeMatteo on October 27, 2010 · 42 comments

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I messed up.  I’m a douche bag.  I’m an asshole.  I’m a recruiter.

***Before going any further, I should mention that you MIGHT want to be familiar with Kanye Wests’ “Runaway” to understand the pop culture reference.  Click here to listen to the song, but honestly, it’s not all that important.

In “Runaway”, Kanye basically sends out a public apology to women he’s dated, Taylor Swift, the world, and even himself.  In the song, Kanye acknowledges that he’s not the greatest guy the world has seen, and that it does make him unhappy.  While he admits his character flaws, he realizes that working on them may or may not change anything.

In recruiting (as well as other professions and areas of life), things will slip through the cracks every so often.  Unfortunately, when it does happen, it’s most likely related to not getting back to a candidate quick enough, or just not getting back to them at all.  It happens often, in fact it’s the number one complaint from job seekers regarding interview processes.

My Douche Bag Moment

A few weeks ago, I interviewed a high-level candidate for a critical position at the  company I work for.  On October 12, the candidate sent an email asking for an update, and then he sent another on October 15 repeating his question.  Somehow, I failed to act on both and completely forgot about it.  On October 24, the candidate let me know of his displeasure by sending me the following email:

I can’t tell you how disappointed I am that you have not shown me the courtesy of responding to either of my past 2 email messages.  I will be sure to mention your lack of responsiveness to my friend who is close with both the CEO and CFO of COMPANY X.

I immediately felt a little shitty when reading the email, but not because this candidate used a threatening tone, or because I feared losing my current contract.  What got to me was the realization that no matter what I do, this IS GOING to happen again and again.  No matter how hard I work at it, situations like this will repeat themselves, and candidates will ALWAYS complain about not hearing back.

I’m not asking you to “runaway”.  I’m not even really calling recruiters “assholes” or “douche bags”.  What I’m trying to say is that I’m sorry.

Maybe I’m speaking for all recruiters here, or maybe I’m just speaking for me, but while I’d love to get back to every candidate, it’s just not going to happen.  People out there will claim there is no excuse for not getting back to a candidate.  I’m not arguing with them, but when you walk through a shit storm you’re bound to get crapped on.

I haven’t heard back after two emails, what do I do?

Don’t send an angry email or voicemail.  I’m not holding it against this particular candidate, but many recruiters/hiring managers would see it as lack of patience on the candidate’s part.  My honest opinion is to wait another full week or two, then send one more email or phone call.  After that, it’s time to forget about the job, and realize that they either don’t have information yet, have gone with someone else, or have forgot about you.

Don’t take it personal.  Just move on.  Just “Runaway”.

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41 comments
Suzettey Clousey
Suzettey Clousey

Either way I do enjoy hearing that song it has a cool ring to it

David Schools
David Schools

I'm not only amused but sickened by this thread. You are Recruiters not HR professionals just sales people. You should really get over yourselves. It is amazing how out of control your ego's have become during a recession. I'm a salesperson and a recruiter but I realize I'm not HR nor do I want to be HR. You people have a sales job you are not attorneys, docs, or even HR with masters most of you like me are sales people. Update the job seeker instead of your profile on about 30 social networks and karma might come your way someday.

S.A.A.
S.A.A.

2 words for you - Overworked Americans! oh and 2 more words - Shit happens! It doesn't call for a threat! TC

Grace Boyle
Grace Boyle

I don't get it (and I'm not a recruiter, have never been, etc. so I am not the expert) but why is it going to happen again and again that recruiters won't respond to emails? Why can't you even say, or acknowledge you got the email? A tiny sentence? Why did you forget? I'm just genuinely curious. My world is all e-mail - we really don't use phones (that often) especially with bloggers, so I would never let that happen. Sometimes I don't have an answer or sometimes I don't have the time to get back to them with the full e-mail response they deserve, but I always say transparently what is going on, respond to their email, thanks for the effort and being genuine...I just don't understand silence. Even a "stop emailing me" or a "no" is better than silence.

Steve Levy
Steve Levy

RD... Invite the fellow back for an interview on a BTR show and let's show the person some recruiter love. This kind of response might Mea Culpa shut the mouths of those who believe that you CAN be perfect every time.

JobJenny
JobJenny

Holy hannah...I'm almost scared to jump in here. I am both the recruiter and the supervisor (and, for that matter, that IT person...receptionist...floor vaccuumer...plant waterer). So, when -- and it's not IF, it's when -- I goof on a follow up? It's all up to me to go back to that person, hat in my freaking hand, and offer up a genuine apology. Not always fun, that is foh sure. But you know what? FOR THE MOST PART, even the most stressed out of job seekers are usually grateful that you've sucked it up, followed up, and given an honest shot at patching up the situation. And they're also usually pretty surprised because, yes, the general stereotype seems to be that we recruiters completely suck, we NEVER call back, and that we only care about our fat commissions. I actually try to use that stereotype in my favor. Because if you assume that's what the world thinks? It's not terribly hard to set yourself apart as excellent in this field given the general belief that people have of our trade. Applause for 'fessing up on the flub. Total. But I'd so love to hear that, the next time this happens? You shock the candidate by calling him directly to say, "Oh wow. I got busy and I totally messed up. I'm sorry. How can I earn back your trust?" (I know, how boring of a post will THAT be?) And then if he's STILL a jerk? Send Marian after him. :)

Marian Schembari
Marian Schembari

OH. MY. GOD. What is everyone's problem? Richie manned up and admitted he made a mistake and he answered a question I know *I* always have had: Why don't recruiters get back to me? I'm sorry to all your recruiters out there, but I've applied and interviewed for A LOT of jobs. Recruiters rarely get back. RARELY. So the fact that everyone's all up in arms about Richie making a mistake? Blow me. Honestly, more recruiters do this than not, and it's actually been really helpful for me to see how and why it happened. Go you, Rich, for putting your mistakes out there to show everyone how it works. Tis much appreciated.

Anna
Anna

As a recruiter, it's impossible to respond to all job seekers - but if a person is selected for an interview, then that person should get a response one way or the other. Phone, email, snail mail - take your pick. But they made the effort, and so should we. It's part of the job, and the amount of goodwill generated is invaluable. Especially considering how few employers give candidates this courtesy. And if this was a "high-level candidate for a critical position at the company," then you DEFINITELY should have sent a response. I mean you - not your supervisor. The real issue isn't about making "everyone" happy. It's about doing the best job you can, recognizing those moments when you make a mistake, and doing what you can to rectify it. And going forward, coming up with a solution/process to ensure that it doesn't happen again.

Marty
Marty

This is a great post! and so true! Unfortunately even the BEST Recruiters make mistakes, the best thing as a human is to admit, correct it, learn from it and move on. FACT you will make mistakes like this in recruiting. FACT you as a candidate IF you are sitting at home worrying about hearing back from a company, well let it go and man up. Take care of yourself and YOUR job search and when you take responsibility for your part, amazingly things start to work out. Try to connect with the company but if it is not meant to be, then move on and keep searching. As a Recruiter you should follow-up with everyone as much as humanly possible even if it is a canned email (which I love the calls you get after that... I wanted to follow-up on the email so I am giving you a call!) Best practice get back to everyone somehow someway, even if you get a bunch of courier pigeons. You can't make Everyone happy so don't try, just do your best. Tip for Recruiters, spend one hour a week cleaning out your inbox or making sure that you have replied to every candidate that is in process with your company. Simple email or quick call goes a long way. But you can't hug all the candidates that want a job, so act like a pro on both sides of the fence and we will all be better off! Good post Rich, keep it up Brother!

Mike Gettinger
Mike Gettinger

Hello Rich, As a fellow recruiter, I cannot help feel your pain. However, I have been on the receiving end of being "forgotten about" and can understand how he feels. With that being said I have talked to many friends and colleagues who are currently looking to do what you said - move on and runaway, it is business. Do not right back angry or leave a nasty voicemail because chances are that can hurt you. The recruiting world is small and we are all connected - I have seen it happen. I had a candidate tear me a new one over voicemail and then called back and apologized saying he had been out of work and was depressed. Thank you for posting your "come to Jesus" moment with such clarity and forthrightness. You are apologizing and moving on is important because you cannot undo what has been done, but you can use this as a "learning opportunity". I know I have "forgotten" about candidates so you are not the only one. Thank you, Mike (fellow asshole)

Steve "The Recruit4U Guy"
Steve "The Recruit4U Guy"

Rich, Very good post. I fall in line with the rest. It is not easy to admit when you are wrong. But, as there is always a but, candidates don't always get it as well. No matter how much we inform them, they do get connected "emotionally" which on one hand that is what we want in terms of them getting excited about a position. The problem is that they get frustrated due to our lack of attention and/or yes forgetting. We have all been in that boat and sometimes it feels like a very big ocean, but you accept it, learn from it and try not to end up there again. My only negative comment was the word "DB"...see I can't even write it out. Point taken though. Good post! Thanks

Kimberly Roden
Kimberly Roden

Rich, I appreciate the clarification -- I was feeling sarcasm when I first read your post and sometimes the candidate bashing in twitter streams is tough and doesn't really help us to move forward. Let's face it, we've all had times where we made mistakes and have had to provide apologies and I think it's great that we take responsibility. What's more important is what we're doing about it going forward. Obviously, I couldn't have known that your manager handled it until you mentioned it. I thought it was just ignored because even though someone says they’re going to complain, they may not always do so. So, yes, there was nothing more you could have done. To clarify, I don't (and never did) believe that everyone who applies for a job should be responded to -- that's impossible. It's the ones that we interview who should be followed up with. I also feel that if we have engaged in a long interview process (I'm clarifying: long interview process) and the candidate was not selected, that we have a responsibility to provide feedback to the candidate about why they may not have been selected. Of course, I'm not implying that we cross any legal boundaries either. Yes, this is a hot button for me and here's why: candidates can be a pain. The resumes can be ridiculous. The things candidates do in interviews can be downright annoying. So, how are we as HR professionals taking action to move these people forward? They may not be a fit for what we're hiring for because of 10 different reasons -- do you tell them why? WHEN it's appropriate, what's wrong with asking the candidate if they'd like feedback from the process if it will assist them in moving forward? Doesn't that help all of us in building relationships? For many recruiters that'll never happen and I understand that. I'm also not saying that we have to become Mother Teresa of the recruiter world -- all I'm saying is to push these job seekers ahead -- if they suck, tell them why. As far as the trashy comment: I'm not a prude and have a bit of a potty mouth -- usually have to catch myself at work…but some words are just better used when we're chatting vs. being written in a post. That’s all I meant Rich. You're helpful to jobseekers -- don’t let credibility be watered down because of appearances. Hope that makes sense. :)

Josh Letourneau
Josh Letourneau

Rich, admitting a mistake isn't a very easy thing to do. Culturally, many Recruiters have learned to respond by blaming the "Sourcer", the "Hiring Manager", and sometimes even the "Job Description". Seriously, kudos to you for owning up to making a mistake on not getting back. I'm not saying that gives you a mulligan, but I do know a few things: 1. It's happened to all of us - Every Recruiter (worth his or her salt) I know can tell a story about how they could have handled a situation better. It's the Recruiter that says they've never made a mistake that scares me - we're all Human. High Performers are always critical of themselves - it comes with the territory; we're always trying to get better. As an example, there were things that aggravated me before 30, but today, I realize those things were utterly inconsequential in the long run. It's why I never over-analyze email communication anymore - it's too one-sided and things can be taken out of context. 2. Candidates often make an emotional commitment to moving forward in the courting and interviewing process. Making a job switch is a really big deal emotionally - when you get that call from a Recruiter, you naturally think about for the rest of the day and longer. You probably go home and discuss it with the people you love - there is an element of change that is exciting in some ways. So when they engage emotionally, it hurts when the other party goes quiet - many Expert Trainers say it's on us to "set expectations", and while I agree, I also say Bullsh*t. If it takes a month to get back to a Candidate, there is no "expectation setting" or "smoothing over" that can often (or could have) overcome this emotional letdown. To any Trainer that would argue this with me, I'd ask when the last time they picked up the phone and engaged with a Candidate on a deep level (no, not a phone screen - lol.) That's the ultimate acid test; it's also the point in the conversation when you hear crickets. 3. It's also my take that Hiring Managers have to understand the emotional element involved, but many could care less or don't get it - As an Exec Recruiter, it's sometimes odd to be a Man explaining to another Man that there is an emotional element that we can leverage if we handle it correctly . . . and then have them look back at you cluelessly as if you're speaking Arabic. They think the word "leadership" is a punchline instead of something real . . . and it's probably why they're making a replacement hire in the first place. In the Corps, I learned that people don't follow you because of the rank on your collar. They follow you because of trust, integrity, and respect. If only Execs in Corporate America could learn this basic tenet. 4. Your post here says to me that you recognize that there will be times that things fall through cracks, but that doesn't mean you accept mediocrity. Not only do you apologize, but you also use the word "Unfortunately". So while we should strive for perfection, that doesn't mean we should overly beat ourselves up when we don't achieve it. Overall, it took guts to put this post out there for public consumption. As you felt so compelled to do so, I imagine this is really a growth opportunity for you. I have them all the time!

DG
DG

Preach it. According to job seekers the number one thing they want is response, followed closely by complete/honest information. Unfortunately, candidates are as bad as recruiters about spamming everything with half a keyword match - the volume is daunting. I've taken to adding "QUALIFIED applicants will receive some form of response within TIMEFRAME" to some of my job postings - at least the expectations are set clearly in that case.

Jen
Jen

Well, if it were me, I would have just assumed that you were either 1) extremely busy because there are likely tons of resumes that come past your desk daily or 2) that you weren't interested. Either way, whether I took it personally or not, I don't think I'd send an email, threatening or otherwise. It just seems childish and not likely to produce favorable results. I suspect some of the frustration people feel is that each recruiter is different and they don't all respond to inquiries the same way. Some recruiters might not mind a follow up email or look at it as being assertive, but others feel bothered, and candidates don’t want to alienate the recruiter, so they are confused as to what is appropriate. I personally try to follow up once or twice and do what is expected of me, I figure if they don’t want to hire me, then it’s their loss, I already know I'm fabulous! It sounds to me from your description that not only was this candidate impatient and hot tempered, but also a bit insecure. Those aren’t exactly quality traits I would look for in someone I was considering hiring.

Laura
Laura

It could have been that critical or high level if you think they should just drop the role, and don't deserve a call or email. There's a difference between low level, cold-sending resume jobs and high level critical roles. I'd think this affects expectations not only on the recruiters side, but also the candidate. If he promptly responded to your requests, he deserves the same. I do think it's slightly different for entry level roles. Regardless, the best recruiters I know base their business on relationships, and dropping the ball without acknowledging directly to the candidate doesn't make for great relationships.

Megan Mirzoeff
Megan Mirzoeff

Rich - I think you handled it the best you can. Its a well known fact, that in life - be it personal or professional - you cannot please everyone. It is virtually impossible. I completely agree the candidate should have called you and been more professional, "Hey Rich, just wondering about he position. I have emailed a few times but I am sure you are very busy, so if you could give me a call back I'd appreciate it. " That right there, it's called being an adult. Posting comments like "you're posts are trashy", is not so adult. I cannot even begin to explain to you how proud I am to know you as a friend and a Professional. You have helped me tremendously in my career, editing resumes/cover letters, and give great advice when situations in the job arise. In my current position - I waited exactly ONE MONTH before I heard back after my 2nd interview. I emailed after the month, received an email back and was hired within three days. Maybe people should realize that EVERYONE is out of work and looking for a job. Recruiters and HR offices are swamped with resumes and if you are patient and professional you might land yourself a job. If not... you'll find yourself unemployed and clearly a little bitter.

Jessica Miller-Merrell
Jessica Miller-Merrell

I'll have to disagree with Kimberly. Rich is trying to be relevant to the present and I like that. Job seekers have a really hard time understanding how recruiters and HR professionals don't call them back. We should, but sometimes we don't, and not in Rich's example because we don't want to. I've been that job seeker that waits by the phone, nervously awaiting a phone call, a letter, something. It doesn't always happen. Job seekers like Rich's often get upset and take it out on the recruiter when they should politely move on. It's not easy but it's just something we (job seekers) have to do. Just like other service oriented industries--retail, restaurants, the like--the customers move on. Job seekers will do the same do. That's the best way to send a message to a company and recruiter. Jessica @blogging4jobs

Lindsey
Lindsey

While I think it is true that Rich should have just emailed the candidate back after the 1st or 2nd email inquiry, his honesty and acknowledgement of his error should be respected. At this point, it is of no use to seek out the candidate to apologize. I've never once gotten an apology from a recruiter and I don't think they necessarily should. They should merely reply to emails! But apologizing after the fact for brushing them off would bring them down to the level of the candidate which I don't believe should be done unless a grave error was committed.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Kim - I appreciate your comments, and I thank you for your opinion. I did the right thing, I let my supervisor handle the situation. I really don't think I'm "celebrating" this at all, and this situation isn't one that makes me proud, but it happens. Any recruiter that says it doesn't happen, is full of it. I apologize if this post or others have come off as "cocky" or "arrogant", but that's far from my intentions or the person that I am. This topic has come up on #JobHuntChat a few times, and each time you've announced your displeasure with candidates not hearing back. I understand it's a topic that upsets you. Each time ithis topic has come up, I've kept firm in my opinions, and this post today hasn't change my overall view. There have been many times I've never heard back from recruiters, and it's an unfortunate part of the process. With that in mind, I do make an effort to get back to everyone that I've spoken with, and this candidate would have eventually heard back, but not soon enough. What this post is saying is that I am truly sorry for that. It's not trying to be arrogant or cocky. I'm not even sure how it's "trashy". I do feel bad that every now and then a candidate will be lost. I WILL work harder at it (as every recruiter should), but there will always be a candidate that slips through sometimes, and that does suck. I realize how shitty that is. If you'd like to talk offline, then I'd welcome the opportunity. I respect you and your opinion, and while I realize it's nothing personal, my goal here wasn't to offend. I apologize if the message was received wrong, but my intentions were sincere in this post.

Kimberly Roden
Kimberly Roden

So, what did you do? Did you do the right thing and call the candidate to apologize? Or are you just going to send him or her a link to this post so the candidate can get the idea slapped in their face with your colorful expressions "celebrating" this type of treatment and basically making an excuse for it? Nothing personal, Rich... I used to enjoy your posts but with all due respect, they're getting pretty cocky and arrogant with a trashy style.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey S.A.A - Yes, shit certainly does happen, but hopefully I'll stop it from happening next time! Thanks for your thoughts here!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Grace - Your questions are completely fair and I'm glad you brought this up. Part of the reason is that recruiters receive more emails than anyone can understand. Imagine being the person that is responsible for all submissions. While many companies have an applicant tracking system in place that sends generic emails back, it's not like that everywhere. What used to be 50 emails per open job, can now easily be 200-300. Multiply that by 30 openings, and you can understand how things get a bit hectic. With that said, recruiters should not ever let an active candidate slip through the cracks. Active meaning that the candidate has had some form of contact with the company. It doesn't happen by design, but it can happen. What also happens it aht sometimes we'll get an email from a candidate asking for an update, but we won't respond right away. We know that in a few days we'll have the right answer, and it is sometimes easier to just wait a day or two to make sure we have everything. Sure, we can send a quick email right then and there, but often times, we have a ton of candidates asking for updates. It doesnt seem like a lot, but it adds up, and our priorities are elsewhere. It really comes down to recruiters being over worked, and needing more help to make sure the company is getting back to everyone and protecting their brand.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Stevie - Letting this one go. The candidate has been contacted and is even being interviewed further.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Jenny - Thanks for your honesty and for your comment. You'd be surprised how many recruiters over on RecruitingBlogs.com told me that they are shocked I could ever let a thing happen. One told me that he would fire me on the spot. Really? It's just unreal. I feel that a lot of recruiters online are just scared about admitting something that they feel will look bad for them. I have no time to hide myself, or my flaws. I'd much rather let out my flaws when they happen so that people know what I can work on. I was told to not follow up with candidates for this position, and apparently, the candidate did receive a phone call from my supervisor the day of the second email. He ignored the call, and emailed me once again. That's the most frustrating part about this, but oh well, life goes on! Thanks!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Marian - you make me laugh, and thanks for your support and comments. Honestly, the candidate would have heard back within another week or two. WE didn't forget about him, I just forgot about his emails. He would have received an update on whether or not they wanted to interview him facet o face, but his outburst in an email only made him look bad. Did I deserve that? Yes. I did. I should have emailed him back after the first email, but I slipped up and I felt awful. I learned from the situation. Thanks!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hi Anna - You are right. I agree with you. In this situation, things were lost in the storm, and I slipped up. It has happened before (not often), and it will happen again. It's happened to us all. Doesn't make it right, but we can only look for ways to improve our work and improve communication. Thanks for your comment.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Marty - Thanks for the comment and your thoughts. I agree with what you've said about the job seekers thought process and their need to take care of themselves. I also like your tip for recruiters. One hour a week should do the trick!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hi Mike - thanks for the comment today, and for also self admitting you join the Recruiter Asshole club. But c'mon now, you really aren't an asshole! We've all had these things happen, and we do our best to resolve the issue. Interesting story about the candidate ripping into you and then calling to apologize. I'm sure that once they settled down, they realized they needed to patch things up with you. Thanks for the comment!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hiya Steve - thanks for the comment. Yes, they do get attached, and we may not be so attached to them, which isn't fun for the candidate. I like what you said right there. I'm sorry about throwing in the DB. I was in a Kanye mood, and he used it in his song. Thanks for sticking through and reading the post!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Kim - thanks again for clarifying and reading my response to your comment. You're right, we need to find ways to help push candidates in the right direction. Doing so will certainly build up the relationship as well as the employment brand of the company. With all of that said, it's still tough to do so. Why? Maybe because it's just not a habit for most of us. Maybe we have too much on our plate (cop out?). Maybe we are afraid of any legal ramification. Maybe we are afraid candidates will receive criticism poorly. Who knows why it doesn't happen, but it's certainly easier to just move on to the other openings we have, and start up another 20 candidates into the process, rather than taking time out of our schedule to help. Many of us know it's not necessarily the right thing to do, but it does happen that way. When candidates ask why they fell short, then I will do my best to give them some information, and point them in ways they can improve, but 90% of the time it's just experience. A good recruiter can dig info out of a shitty resume and find out who the person is, but a shitty resume won't make up the required experience. And, I'm sorry for the trashy words used, but these are words used in Kanye's song. I tried posting the disclaimer up top, but figured people would get the idea, and that is my mistake. In other posts, I do say asshole a lot, and a very very short list of other curse words, but I do try to limit. Thanks again for the comment, Kim!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Josh - Wow, it seems like you just wrote a mini post here, or rather a large post! Thanks for your feed back, support, and guidance today. Means a lot to have you on my side. Your points in #2 and #3 caught my attention, and I never looked at things quite like that. The emotion involved in the job search is crushing, and it's important for recruiters and hiring managers to understand that part of things. Thanks again for your comment.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey DG - I really like your addition of "QUALIFIED applicants" to the job description. It does set some sort of expectation to candidates that you are unable to reach. Thanks for your thoughts here!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Jen - You're right. Each recruiter does handle their business a bit different, and that is a huge frustration for folks. I think your approach is best. Follow up once a week, and up to 3 times. After that point, if you get nothing back, then maybe it's best to move on. Thanks for your comment!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hi Laura - You make a great point, and it's one I believe in. I don't purposely try to NOT respond to candidates. It does happen, and all recruiters have been suspecct of this at some point. I recently found out that the candidate did receive a voicemail from my supervisor a few days after his second email, so I'm shocked that he still sent me a third email. Just seems odd.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Meg - thanks for your support and thoughts on this. I think if the candidate acted how you've said, it would have been better received on my part, but I can't let myself off the hook so easy. I'll improve myself, and look for ways to get back to folks quick, even when I have other high priority tasks at hand. Maybe he's a tad bitter, but the candidate has a great job already. He's maybe just a bit impatient, but he deserved to hear SOMETHING soon after his first or second email.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Jessica - thanks for your thoughts and opinions on this. Being that job seeker isn't easy, and we have all been there. We want to yell and scream and shout, but really, does that ever help? In this case, he did get a call back, and he would have eventually received contact. It's not like I completely forgot about the candidate altogether. I simply forgot about providing an update now, but there would have been one in a week, or two, or maybe three. Thanks for this!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Lindsey - thanks for the comment and your thoughts. Always better to get back to someone, even if you don't have the proper information. It was a slip up, and it happens.

Megan Mirzoeff
Megan Mirzoeff

I just witnessed a woman giving a phone interview in the bathroom while she was peeing. Now THAT is "trashy".

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Meg - That's terrible. Was the person conducting the phone screen, or being interviewed?

Marty
Marty

Either way... that is terrible.