If you’ve got it, flaunt it

by Rich DeMatteo on January 7, 2010 · 125 comments

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Welcome to my post about resume length.  If you came in from a search engine expecting pictures of busty women, well, I’m sorry to disappoint.  You can leave now if you wish, but stick around and you might learn a thing or two.  Oh, and if you actually are new to COTJ, please click here to  sign up for my RSS feed.

Peter Griffin Flaunt it

Peter flaunts it

I’m going to try to keep this post short and sweet, just like the HR/Recruiting experts I trust, love, adore, and am friends with say a 20 somethings resume should be.  In writing this post I’m going to keep my thoughts to a minimum, take out important details from what I’ve learned in my recruiting experiences, and bunch everything together so that I don’t go beyond 375 words (or one page).  Doesn’t that sound just like your resume writing strategy?  Yep, it does.  Yikes.

Before going too much further, please realize I’m not advising to go write up a 5 page resume.  I’m not for anything that is a waste, so after reading this quick rant you definitely shouldn’t go nutty banana party on your resume, stretching it for pages and pages.  Don’t do that, idiot.  Just…listen.

Not all college students, but a portion of of them are involved in leadership positions, activity programming boards, and work internships, all while making the Dean’s List, studying abroad, and getting inducted into their programs honors society.  As a recruiter, I want to know every bit of that delicious shit.  I want to see every leadership position.  I want to know activities you planned on campus, and I definitely want to know which internships, and how many you took on while a full-time student.

Flaunt it, baby.  Flaunt it.

Don’t hold back.  Let us read the goods.  List everything worth mentioning, which means it shows your value to the company.  Provide details, but don’t write bullshit either.  With every addition to your resume, ask yourself, “Does this prove my value?”  If yes, then please include.  If no, then take it off.  So simple.

No one expects that you have the experience to warrant more than one page.  If you really do, then prove them wrong.

What’s your opinion?

Do you think I’m a jackass?  Great, tell me that, and make sure you tell me why.

HR/Recruiters –  Do you seriously discount skilled candidates if their resume is longer than a page?

Current and previous job seekers – Do you only use a one page resume?  Why?  Who brain washed you?

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106 comments
Bridget Forney
Bridget Forney

Well what if the interviewer asks the question, "What can you tell me about yourself that's not on your resume?" If you've "flaunted it" all -- you'll have nothing more to say, will you!!!???

Kirk Baumann
Kirk Baumann

Rich, Great article on resumes. I don't think there is a one size fits all solution for this. In my opinion, if you're qualified and the information brings value, your resume can be more than one page. If it can fit in one page, great. If not, then make sure that the second page is really, really needed. For most recent college grads, one page is enough. But again, there are exceptions to the rule. Thanks for opening up this forum, Rich. I'm sure you'll get pros and cons from everyone! :)

R_McCracken
R_McCracken

I've always been a fan of quality over quantity when it comes to resumes. I don't care if your resume is one or two pages (three is stretching it) but the quality of it is what is important. If it has crazy italics or other formatting that make it difficult to read, or if it has a lot of spelling or grammar errors, it will put you a disadvantage relative to your peers. When scanning a hundred resumes for a position, I want to see one that will easily convey the information and explain why you are the most qualified for the position. Linking your resume to outside sources (Linkedin, twitter, etc.) helps because I can then further explore candidates that I am interested in when I want more information.

mike d
mike d

Hey Rich, I read what you wrote about your reoccurring dream, the one where you are paralyzed by a ghost. Do you know this is a very common sleep condition know as Sleep Paralysis. I've had it all my life. My reoccurring dream was there is a monster under the bed reaching out with a long arm and pinning me down so i can't move or breath. I use to tell my mom about it when i was little but she always told me "i must have just been dreaming". Then when i went to college my RA pass out pamphlets warning us about this condition called "sleep paralysis" and how to avoid it. Supposedly how it happens is during times of extreme stress and sleep deprivation (sounds like college exam week to me...maybe this is why it happened to you in your dorm?)the body falls asleep due to exhaustion but the brain remains active because it is so stressed out. This causes the sensation of being trapped in your body. It can be really scary and uncomfortable (i know) but what i've learned works best is to try to remain calm and control my breathing. Slowly as i feel my chest move with my breaths i sort of relearn how to move my body again. The best thing is to avoid this all together and sleep when you are tired... good luck! It's pretty interesting when you read more about it and i'm sure there are articles that do a better job of explaining it than me. I just thought you'd be interested to know you're not the only one. Hope this helps. ~mike.

Jason Davis
Jason Davis

Rich, I think that resume length should be directly correlated to experience. In my opinion, few, if any, graduating seniors have enough experience to warrant more than 1 page. In fact, I like when experienced professionals stick to one page as well. Why? Because it forces them to put the most relevant, hardest-hitting experience on paper. As a busy recruiter or hiring manager, I probably won't absorb much more than one page anyway. When hiring for our firm, I sometimes see resumes 4+ pages. Pains me to read them sometimes. Stick to 1 page, and use links to your virtual cv, linkedin, twitter, etc. to allow me to learn more about you if I need more. By the way.... aren't some things just better delivered in person? A resume should get you in the door, an interview should get you the job.

Marty
Marty

The debate that never dies "does size matter". I have been reading resumes for 12 years and writing them for the past 4. To sum it up, to each his own, I have heard the pros/cons over the years and the best advice I can give is to be honest and be sure it represents your accomplishments. Resume length, in my opinion should be kept to a minimum (this will vary for each indvidual) and showcase accomplishments. I have seen awesome resumes for college graduates that are 1 pagers and a few with great accomplishments that were 2 -3 pages long. Best advice: Read your own, If it bores YOU. It will most likely bore a recruiter/hiring manager. You also must have others read and critque your resume. Cover letters: I always prefer candidates who put them into emails, makes it easier, for me as the recruiter. To be 100% honest I glance at the cover letter then read it ONLY after I read the resume. Many of the Hiring managers and recruiters I have worked with over the years RARELY looked hard at the cover letter, unless the position has a writing requirement. Best Advice: Keep it short and simple in an email and tailor the cover letter to each position you apply. My 2cents... Keep up the great work Rich! Thanks Marty

"Recruit4U Guy"
"Recruit4U Guy"

Great thread..I admit I did not read all..but here is my "corncopia" of comments... WIIFM- "what is in it for me"...when I read a resume, if I can't answer this as the reader..it goes in the B pile. SWWC- "So what who cares".....if after I read it and say SWWC..it goes in the B pile..Too often candidates write very eloquent job descriptions...and write 3-5 job descriptions. It is not the over usage of action verbs and nouns, but rather, adding the Oprah ....ahh...hah factor or WOW factor. Show me your successes and how they can translate in being successful for me and my clients..Not easy for most folks but a great goal to work towards in completing your resume. Great Blog....Steve

Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter
Jacqui Barrett-Poindexter

Hi Rich, Superb article and conversation! Love Erin's, Debra's, Karen's, et al's heartfelt replies. My take: Resume's initial purpose--grab attention and compel the phone call. Ongoing purpose, fuel the interview conversations. If arbitrary rules about resume length are used as success measuring tools, then the resume author has lost sight of the goal. The ferreting process to result in a highly targeted, clearly focused and resonating resume is complex, exhausting and intellectually rigorous. For those reasons, and because most people are 'lost' when navigating the resume writing course, 2+ resumes that emerge often are unfocused, blathering and, thus, are passed over. With a crystallized message that says, "I can fix your problems and even those emerging problems that are yet to erupt," a meaty, meaningful resume (regardless of length) will SELL the candidate, and equip the recruiter, HR leader and hiring manager to make nimble, long-lasting and ROI-focused decisions. My 3 cents!

Debra Wheatman
Debra Wheatman

Here's my 2 cents: There is no right or wrong answer for resume length. If you can sell 'it' in one page great. If not - and many people with longer work histories will have more to say, two pages might work for them. At the end of the day, the resume that gets you the interview is the one that works! It could be two pages or one page.

Karen Siwak
Karen Siwak

There is no one-size-fits-all rule on resume length. I've had senior executives with 20+ years of experience for whom I've created a kick-ass resume that was one page. I've had a 14 year old who had so many awards, volunteer experiences, companies that she started, etc., that she couldn't be presented in less than two. If you are starting your resume writing process by deciding the number of pages, then you are grabbing the wrong end of the stick. Start by figuring out which of your accomplishments - academic, professional, community, personal - are going to be relevant to your target audience, and then find the most clear and succinct way of saying it. What is relevant when you are applying for temporary or junior-level contract positions is going to be different from what you need if you are applying for entry-level career-track positions. New graduates often have to pull from more areas of their life than more seasoned professionals, because they have fewer jobs (or more precisely, fewer relevant jobs) Always think always in terms of what your target audience wants and needs to know. For every word and phrase you use, go through a ruthless editing process. Ask yourself the "so what" question for each bullet. If you can't answer it, it doesn't belong on your page. Only after you've got the content defined should you start figuring out how best to present it. For some people, its going to take two pages. For some people, it can be done on only one (here's a link to an example of a new grad, one pager, for those that are interested http://bit.ly/7l4zgy). There is a diminishing return on visibility of content, especially once "a human" is involved. The further down into the document a key fact or piece of information is, the less likely it is that this information will get noticed. If its important for the target job, find a way to make it front page news. A final thought. The best format will also depend on the job search strategy you intend to use. If you mostly intend to apply online to advertised positions, your resume will need to include all the relevant keywords to make it through candidate screening software. This is often hard to do on only one page. If you will you be networking your way to your next position, you may be better served with a more tightly written and presented one-pager. If you intend to have a multi-pronged job search strategy (highly recommended, by the way), consider having different versions, with different lengths, for different purposes. After all, it is a marketing document. You don't see companies tying themselves to only one piece of marketing collateral. And neither should you.

Mitchell Savage
Mitchell Savage

I have 25 years of experience, have started and sold three businesses, hold both undergrad and graduate degress, have worked in three industries, have worked internationally, and my resume is _one_ page long. I accomplished this by editing well, and therefore, my resume is dense enough to show that I am not puffing. There is one reason to have a two-page resume: because you're willing to have the recruiter know that you do not care about their time. When I am hiring, I look very dimly at the people who don't care about my time enough to articulate their attributes concisely, (especially the ones who claim to have strong writing skills! Always a source of a good laugh.) I agree with Rich: "If you've got it, flaunt it." My one-page resume does so by showing the hooks from _all_ my experience and training, including community and personal stuff. My resume also shows my strong writing skills by accomplishing all of that in a single page, easy for readers and dense enough to make them want more, not less. Whatever you think belongs on the second page of your resume actually belongs in the interview. As a manager whose role includes hiring, I am telling you frankly: your failure to edit is costing you interviews. Period.

Steph Auteri
Steph Auteri

Okay, I'm going to jump in here. (Days later...) I'd first like to echo what the ever-so-wise Matt Chevy said above: Most resumes look pretty much the same after you've been looking at them for awhile; the cover letter is where you should really let yourself shine. Seven years out of college, my work experience cannot possibly fit onto one page. So this is what I do: I have a master resume that I display on my professional website, and that I keep on file. Then, whenever I have to send my resume off to a possible employer, I tailor it carefully for the position I'm applying for. If I'm honest with myself regarding what is and is not relevant, I can usually get it down to one page pretty easily. I know that every HR professional and hiring manager has their own preference, but I've been asked to keep it to one page by so many temp agency contacts and prospective employers that I now do it consistently just to be safe.

Shane Mac
Shane Mac

I think of the resume as a pointer. Length, experience, leadership, interesting stuff, etc... there is no one size fits all answer for any of that and the best thing to do is try something new if it is not working. Here is what I believe... A resume should inspire the reader to want to learn more because what you did seems so incredibly awesome that they can't help but check it out. Give the HR somewhere to look, somewhere to go, and use the resume as a launching pad. Clearly tell them that they should check it out HERE or THERE. Your goal should be to distract the hell out of HR for 30 minutes. That's when you get the call or interview. They can get through your resume quicker than any of the others but since they liked what they read so much they had to go learn more AND they had a place to go. What if you don't have somewhere to point them? I truly believe that many people could save a lot of time looking for jobs and avoid low level job positions if they spent a few months or even a year building and creating something that they believed in. Instead of sending out resumes for the next 6 months and not getting the job offer or interviews that you want, spend 6 months building something, anything, that you can point at forever. Whether that be a blog, a charity, a business, it doesn't really matter. Remember this: Job titles are made up names. If you start and build your own thing then you can be whatever you want. If you go to godaddy and buy a URL then you are the FOUNDER. Likewise, if you have a lemonade stand on the corner then you are a business owner or CEO or President, whatever you want. It seems weird at first but trust me, it is that easy. You think lemonade stand sounds dumb right? Coffee Shops did at one time too... :) It's the principle and traits of building something that set you apart not to mention the job title you give yourself by doing it. You won't think of it like that right away but trust me, Founder on your resume will trump everything, especially if you have passion for it.

Executive Resume Writer
Executive Resume Writer

Correction: "...would absolutely NEVER cut out RELEVANT information, just to keep it to 1 page." Erin

Executive Resume Writer
Executive Resume Writer

Do I think you're a jackass? Not at all... well, sort of. I'M KIDDING. I would absolutely NEVER cut out information just to keep it to 1 page. I agree with you on leaving in associations, internships, etc. All that is so important and shows the reader the clients motivation/ambition. I recently did a resume where the client had 5 pages of really interesting and relevant info (um, yea-a bit much). I hesitated leaving anything out, but managed to get the majority of it onto 2 pages (omitting projects from high school). It was very impressive (I was not that ambitious in college, I just wanted to graduate-- LOL) regardless of it being 'more than one page' or not. If I left anything else out, the resume probably wouldn't have sounded so good. So, my bottom line and overall thought about '1 or 2 pages' ends with this: If the experience warrants it, then leave it in. If it isn't relevant to what you want to do, leave it out. Have a great weekend! Erin (@erinkennedycprw)

Sean Cartell
Sean Cartell

Thanks so much for writing this article! I completely agree and have always been so opposed to those who demand 1-page resumes. No two people out there are alike, you can't fit every job applicant into a certain type or formula, so why should you force each applicant to have uniform resumes? In fact, the resumes that most get noticed are those that stand out. One of the best resumes I ever saw was actually close to five pages. The first page of the resume was genius - it was that stereotypical one-page resume that summarized education and seven different full-time jobs as well as a summary of qualifications and skills. The remaining pages provided details of those various experiences to break down what the job candidate had done and was capable of doing. All of this showed the potential value the candidate could bring to the organization. This was a win-win resume because if the hiring manager wanted a concise 1-page resume, they had everything they needed and wouldn't have to print off any additional pages. If they were interested and wanted more, they had that too.

Rebecca
Rebecca

Hi Rich, This is a great post, and I enjoy the discussion happening here. As a soon-to-be college graduate, I'm starting to evaluate my resume and decide what's relevant and what can be cut. Most of the professionals I've talked to encouraged keeping my resume one-page long, but many have differing views. I wonder what role social media plays in the length of my resume. For example: Is it okay to keep job/leadership descriptions short and concise on a paper resume but elaborate on my LinkedIn profile? Rebecca

Samantha
Samantha

Hi Rich, This post has blown up. Nice (corn on the...) job. Get it? I bet that's the first time you've gotten that joke. Moving on... My resume is currently resized into oblivion, but that's because I've always been told that having a resume over one page will make recruiters bored. I see pros and cons to both sides. While I want a recruiter to see my expertise, I also know that if I were a recruiter, I would value concise expertise - no filler. I see a lot of students that tend to put filler on their resume, and that's just as bad. I think applicants tend to temporarily forget that recruiters have more than one resume they're looking over. With that said, my resume has never hurt me advance professionally (at least I think), because I only put the best of the best of what I've done on there - half of what I do doesn't even make it on. I also think it's important to articulate that a resume gets you to an interview. It doesn't get you the job. Rock the resume and cover letter, and you get full VIP access to shine when you meet the recruiter face-to-face. Look forward to reading more from you. Sincerely, Sam

Jessica
Jessica

Ugh, see this is what I like to hear! My resume is a little over 2 full pages, and I've been editing it down to one depending on the job I'm applying for. However, no matter what I do, I end up leaving out a TON of stuff. Stuff that's important to me and I think would be important for that person to know. The problem is, how do I figure out if it's okay to send a longer resume?

Caitlin
Caitlin

I used to think that the one pager was a rule set in stone but as I've had more experience I have had to extend it out a little longer than 1 page. I would say if you don't have a ton of experience then it should be 1 page, don't embellish or fluff. If you have a project that you're really proud of and you need a little more room to explain it then do so.

JR Moreau
JR Moreau

Interesting post Rich. I personally feel that my resume should have the high level basics on there. I'm looking to develop a relationship with potential employers when I'm applying to jobs, not try and figure out a way to get them to know me in 1 minute. I'd rather have a solid list of my accomplishments, experiences and skills on 1 page of a resume and then have links to all of my social media networks where people can really dig around and figure out if I'm their man or not.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Only flaunt the most valuable tidbits. You don't want to put everything out there, but if it's a valuable experience, it should be on the resume. What I don't like is when people force everything on one page. If it needs to go to 1.5 or 2 pages, then make sure it's because the information is valuable to know, and I'll have no problem with it. People are brainwashed to stick to one page. It doesn't make sense to me. Thanks Fidget

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Kirk - I tend to agree with you. My thought is that if the info is relevant and important put it on. If that means 2 pages then go for it, if that means 1 then alright! Yeah, this article definitely brought in tons of pros and cons, but that is exactly what's needed.... a discussion on this topic! Thanks for your thoughts!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey there R_McCracken - Thanks for your thoughts on this. I agree that tossing in the linkedin and twitter can help keep a recruiter on someone if they have interest. Thanks for your comment!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Great points here, Jason. We may disagree on the length, but I like the idea of using a virtual cv, linkedin, and twitter to drive people over to read more about someone. The interview should always be to close the deal and the resume to gain interest

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Marty - this debate certainly never dies, but with each group of students graduating comes a new group of people that need to hear from us. "if it bores you, it will bore a recruiter" - excellent point I agree with you on cover letters - toss them into the body of the email. Also agree on only reading them after the resume and tailoring them for each position.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Steve - thanks for stopping by. WIIFM and SWWC are great and an interesting way to look at resumes. Doyou keep a C pile as well? Some people do A, B, and C, especially at job fairs.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Thanks for your 3 cents, Jacqui, this post keeps brining me more $ and I love it. An on-going theme in this discussion has been that the resume needs to push further contact. I think that is something that everyone on this list agrees with. No matter how long the resume is, it needs to find a way to push for a phone call or interview so that we can expand on our resume and show who we really are. You make your point that most 2+ page resumes are unfocused and blathering, but those that pull it off, while not installing fluff or BS can just as easily grab a phone call or interview from their resume, which will help a healthy ROI to both recruiter and candidate.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Bring on the $ Debra - we'll take it! Some people above would say that the 2 page resume will stop them from reading further and may even disqualify you from the job, but that is NOT what I say. People are different, so resumes are different. People explain their skill differently, but when people are skilled, they will be found. Unless of course they don't know how to write, and can not edit their resume at all...

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Karen, appreciate you leaving your expert opinion on the topic. I could write pages on pages in response to your comment, but you've said it so nicely! I really like what you say in regards to applying to jobs through postings or through networking. Even those who tend to simply network, should make sure to have some key words. Even in networking, their resume gets distributed somehow to a recruiter/manager and then that resume may be entered into the system. If they don't receive the job from that company at that point, a strong key word resume could bring up their name in the future. Thanks for adding value to this!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Mitchell, thanks for leaving your thought on this and some valuable insight into how someone with a great deal of experience can cut it down. While I think it is great that you were able to pull it off, I don't necessarily agree. Many times I see a second page as a way to make it easier on my eyes, which I appreciate. If the fluff is present, then you can easily pick up on that and move on from the resume. Fluff is noticed right away on the first page, not on a second page. I don't agree with your last sentence. I've green lighted interviewing and hiring on hundreds of candidates who had more than one page of a resume. You seem to be on the extreme end, but this is exactly what I want to hear from this discussion. People need to realize that there are managers out there that DO feel like you and won't review resumes that go longer than a page. I don't agree with it, but I understand that there are many folks out there who feel that way. Appreciate your response and experience. Hope to have you back here more.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Glad to have you here Steph...never too late. Cover letters are great for a secondary interest point. I don't look at them until there is interest. I don't care to read a full letter, I don't. Do I go to HR Jail? No. Most recruiters will say the same thing when they are busy. I like how you tailor the resume for each job. That's something that people only do for cover letters usually, so you doing that for the resume is impressive. When something is relevant, never take it off. If you know that you can take many things off and get to a page without sacrificing value and quality, then go for it!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Shane - yep, resume is a pointer. Up above, Lance made the point that resumes are just starting points and in the interview they find out everything about the candidate. Distracting an HR person for 30 minutes, won't happen in the screening stage. It won't. Recruiters these days have too many candidates to review and a half hour is what like already 1/16 of their day. You'll be lucky to distract them for more than 5 minutes. Viable candidates may get 5 minutes (if that), and candidates not matching the job will get 30 seconds to a minute. I like your energy and desire to push people to start up something. The founder title will always generate even a little interest, but it won't always mean that the candidate will get a job. It depends what job you are applying for. If someone is applying for a technical support job, Founder on the resume may mean absolute shit in that situation, but it won't hurt.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

See that everyone, that's coming from a PRO resume writer. "absolutely NEVER cut out RELEVANT information, just to keep it to 1 page."

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

I was waiting for a pro-resume writer to chime in! Thanks for stopping by Erin. Paragraph 1 - Score 1 point for me :o) - Never leave out information that is important. Associations, internships, etc. It is all important. Glad you agree on that. How long did it take you to cut the resume down to 2 pages, from 5? I can't imagine the head ache involved, but you managed to cut it down to a very reasonable 2 pages, while also keeping his/her value in the resume. Enjoy your weekend, hope to see you back here more!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Sean - thanks for your thoughts. No two people are the same, and that is definitely the case with graduating students. Wow, 5 page resume genius? Seems like he/she found a way to send almost 2 resumes in one, which is clever, but risky. Worked out in their favor so I can't say anything negative about it.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Rebecca - Yes. Definitely! Use your resume to summarize your leadership positions, then make sure to mention links to social media at the bottom. Make sure to leave a solid summary of your positions, so that it will entice them to head on over to your Linkedin profile. This is sort of how it works with cover letters for me. When I read a resume, I won't open the cover letter unless I really feel like it. When there are 100 resumes for one position coming through my desk, there is simply not enough time to read both. If you look like a fit and interest me, then I'd open your cover letter and check out your linkedin before sending off to the hiring manager for that position. Thanks for stopping by - I hope you come back more to leave comments!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Sam - Thanks for the corny joke. Usually I wouldn't allow it, but this is a corn themed employment blog. It can stay. Not going to lie, a lot of resumes are sent our way, even when the job market is like present times. The one page resume is quicker for us, so long as information isn't scattered all about and forced to fit. Not saying that is what you do, just making that clear. I like your attitude/thoughts on 'shining' once you make it to the face-to-face. Without strong interviewing skills the resume will mean nothing. Backing up what's on the resume in person is obviously all that matters in the end. Thanks for leaving your comments, Sammy. Hope to hear more from you soon. Richie

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Jessica - list for me the activities you've taken a part of besides classwork. In short, just leave everything that you believe shows your value to an organization. I'm OK with resumes being over 1 page for new grads, but over 2 is definitely pushing it. Respond back to let me know exactly what you want to keep in...

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

I agree with you completely, Caitlin. As long as something is important to you, and it is something you are proud of, then it should definitely be on there. Even if it isn't 100% relevant, it still shows who you are. Thanks for the comment!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Thanks for jumping in here, JR. You bring up a good point. A resume can/should direct a possible employer to your viewable online work. Whether it's a link to a blog, portfolio, or linkedin, it's always a good way to direct them for more information when they have interest.

Recruit4U Guy
Recruit4U Guy

A, B or C...really with the volume of resumes right now A or B...but I did take the time and make sure there is a differance between A or B, sometimes it goes to C and beyond... Seriously, if someone can really sell their Value proposition, then the length does not really matter, and of course if they could do that recruiters and resume writers would be out of work. Keep it up...great job and let' s connect..Nice job!!!!

Mitchell Savage
Mitchell Savage

Thanks, Rich. To be clear, I don't automatically disqualify a candidate who used two pages. (I'm hiring someone next week that had a two-pager.) But to me, it's a strike against the writing skills category.

Shane Mac
Shane Mac

Totally agree with your points... (I was telling more of a fisherman's story) 30 minutes was just meaning... make them interested in you. About the Founder, CEO, etc... I really am just passionate about building and doing something so that you have something to share with the HR folks. Your posts is on commenting craziness! Nice work!

Executive Resume Writer
Executive Resume Writer

I usually don't like to say NEVER about things because it will come and bite me in the as#! LOL It took a while to cut the resume down from 5 pages to 2, but in truth he had it spread out pretty bad. I just condensed, grouped, stretched and shortened. His info really spoke for itself. I didn't read any of the comments yet, but it sounds like we are in the minority? Take care. Erin

Jessica
Jessica

Would you mind if I just e-mailed you my resume and if you had time you could let me know what you would consider irrelevant?

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Steve, thanks for getting back to me on this. A and B is definitely easier right now with the high volume recruiters/staffing is experiencing. It's understandable and I'm sure needed. Looking forward to connecting this week, I'll reach out to you shortly! Thanks.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Thanks for clarifying, Mitchell. I can understand your point in a strike against writing skills. What if the job is a non-writing position? For instance, a technical support rep would have minimal to zero writing needed to perform the job well. Would they still lose points in this situation?

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Think you are on the right track with building something to share. Also, you've spoken before about finding other ways to connect to people, perhaps offering a service to them is one. I think your innovative ideas will help you now and in the future. Great ideas and wonderful value add to this post. Thanks.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Erin - skim through the comments and leave your thoughts on some where you think WE'RE right. There is a solid, healthy & friendly debate going on. I'd say right now its 60/40 in favor of keeping a resume to ONLY one page.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

I'll take some time to look over it, Jessica. Probably won't get to it this weekend, but I'll make sure to spend 5-10 minutes reviewing. Send it to CornOnTheJob AT Gmail.com