6 Tweets That Could Help Land A Job

by Rich DeMatteo on November 30, 2010 · 6 comments

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A couple weeks ago I provided some real life examples of how a Tweet could ruin your chances of landing the job.  Basically, I searched for real tweets about job interviews, and the lack of professionalism was appalling.  Click here to check out that post.

When all was said and done, a few Corn Heads suggested I search for some positive Tweets that could actually give someone an advantage.  Well, you’d think it would be easy to find real examples, but it’s actually quite difficult.  It’s much easier to target unprofessionalism in Tweets, simply because it’s happening much more than professional tweets.  With that said, I WAS able to find 6 examples that could actually help a candidate.

The on-going theme in the Tweets I found is positivity, excitement, correct spelling and grammar, and staying away from desperation.  In the end, it may actually be best if candidates keep to themselves about their interview or  maybe “less is more” when it comes to Tweeting about a job or an interview.

Check out the below 6 tweets, add in your thoughts in the comments section, and pass on to your network!

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

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6 comments
Dawn Lambrow
Dawn Lambrow

While I applaud the positivity and coherency of the tweets, it's not good practice to share information about employment on the web (after the company has issued a formal news blurb or press release about the hire may be a different story). Doing so shows loose lips which may be seen by potential employers as a possible future liability.

Diana Antholis
Diana Antholis

I see what you mean about it being hard to find professional tweets. At least these were coherent! Personally, I think that if you have an interview - you should keep it to yourself until it's over and some decision has been made. And I would only tweet it to inform others of my new job. I've heard of people tweeting to GET an interview. How do you feel about that? Example may be that they tweeted to a certain company that they would love X position and want to come interview.

Bridget Forney
Bridget Forney

These were all basically the same example. I wish you would have had a mix of really different examples/tweet themes and then indicated what, in each tweet, was increasing that person's chances of getting hired... : P Still, good point. What is your policy on company's tweeting about new hires? When is too soon? And is it okay to tweet an employer "thank you for the interview" after meeting them?

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Dawn - I agree with you, and I did make mention of that in the post! I agree with what you've said, and folks need to practice caution!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Diana - Yes, coherent is good! I tend to agree with you. There may be some cases where it's a good thing, such as with small PR/Social Media agencies where engagement is key. Maybe then it helps a candidate out! Tweeting to get an interview is cool. I mean, isn't that social networking? As long as they are confident in their previous tweets to be professional, because the company will certainly investigate!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Bridget - Yep, there really isn't much a person should Tweet about when it comes to their interview. I'm against it completely, and don't think they should talk about their interviews or company or job on Twitter. That's the camp I belong to though. Excitement, positivity, and stellar spelling and grammar is what will set candidates apart, because there are way more negative and unprofessional job interview tweets than positive. So really, besides these, there isn't much someone can do. I think it's OK to tweet the employer if it's a social media related position. Other than that, I'd avoid it. And I guess for PR/Social Media related positions, companies would want to Tweet about new employees. I'd suggest that after they've been trained or have gone through initial 30-60 day probation they should tweet. Even when someone starts you can't be sure they will succeed, and a company shouldn't notify someone as an ambassador until after they are comfortable this person will be there for at least a little while. Thanks for the comment!