There’s More To Your Career Than Passion

by Rich DeMatteo on March 18, 2010 · 63 comments

3 Flares 3 Flares ×

I read Gary Vaynerchuk’s book, Crush It!, and I loved it.  I loved every ounce of that book, and I’m on board with Gary’s cry out to “cash in on your passion”.  But after having that word, passion, jack hammered into my brain, my eyes and ears became much more sensitive to the word, and it began popping up EVERYWHERE.

If you’re a career or job search blogger and you don’t talk about passion, then consider yourself the minority.  You can find a post, or two here on COTJ discussing the topic, where I clearly state I’m a fan.  So please, don’t lecture me on the importance of passion.  I’m on board, but I do have some beef.

Experience > Passion

Candidates cannot rely solely on passion to get a job.  In the eyes of a recruiter or hiring manager, experience, and how well a candidate can communicate their experience will always rank damn near the top of the list when it comes to hiring.

When a company advertises a position that requires  5 years of experience, a candidate expressing their passion with zero years of related experience won’t get the job.  This is obvious, but needs to be said.

Experience is critical.  Especially in corporate life.

Corporate Passion

I’ve been bothered lately by how many people talk smack on the 9-5, and hate on the corporate life.  It’s easy to get brainwashed out there with so many bloggers telling you to move away from that lifestyle.  The truth of the matter is that I know many happy people who have climbed the corporate ladder, have passion in their corporate career, and are successful in life outside  their jobs.

If you try out corporate life and find out the 9-5 isn’t for you, then move away from it.  Don’t let bloggers tell you who you are, or what to do.

Side Projects & Start-ups

No passion in your 9-5?  Look to start-ups and side projects to carry out your passion.  Too tired to work more after work?  Join a softball or bowling team.

Whatever you gain enjoyment from is what you should be doing in life.  Contrary to popular belief, you do not NEED to be absolutely crazy about your job.  It’s important to at least enjoy it a little, like the people, and make the cash required to support your chosen lifestyle, but passion in your career is not a requirement to be a happy human.

Last Remarks

To be clear again, I’m not anti-passion.  I’m a huge proponent of passion and its importance for careers/jobs and life in general.  I’m an HR guy, and employee engagement (always a hot HR topic) certainly increases when workers are passionate about their job.  I have a passion for Corn On The Job, good food, working out, hockey, coaching hockey, talking to friends, and meeting new friends.

I also have a passion for starting conversations:

What is your opinion on passion as it relates to careers?  Is your passion something completely unrelated to work?

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
54 comments
Financial Samurai
Financial Samurai

Rich I think those who smack talk the 8-6pm lifestyle generally are either too young, or have failed in corporate America. Perhaps not failed, but are duds with really no future. They then quit their jobs, and are duds again with no money. I don't understand why people can't do BOTH. Have a steady paycheck and do something on the side. It's so easy, folks just have to want to do it and want to succeed. Rgds, Sam

Walter
Walter

We all have our passion in life. The important thing thought is acting on it, be it in the 9-5 work or pursuing your own. The last thing we want is to experience regret of why we have not followed our passion. :-)

Sam Diener
Sam Diener

COTJ -- Hope all is well. Great article once again. I think that it would be fair to say it is very easy for all of us social media people to get taken by this stuff. When we are able to have all of these entrepreneurs who have made it out of the 9-5 in our FACE every day, it makes it SO much more easy to bash the 9-5. However, we might be thinking it has so much more of a grip on everyone because we ARE in this position. Thoughts? Sam

Elisa
Elisa

I think the reason so many people hate the posts on "passion" and the idea behind it is the romanticized way it is valued (which you fortunately did not do here!) We all have heard the stories about "this guy" that "someone knew" that just loved his job 135%, worked 60+ hours a week and was an all around great guy so he got promoted to Vice President within 6 months of his hire. This RARELY happens. As you noted, there are many other factors that take a higher precedent than pure passion. And passion alone will not sustain you in a career. Skill, experience, adaptability and other things must be part of the package as well. Regardless of whether you are "just" some 9-5 drone or a "brilliant" entrepreneur. Great post Rich!

Darleen
Darleen

This is something that has been making me think all week, since finding Crush It and watching video by Gary Vaynerchuk. It first statement was if you are not doing work that you are passionate about, then Stop It. hmmm... so what about garbage collectors, and all the wonderful jobs that we need people to do - I cannot believe they are passionate about them? I worked at a large company years back, and there was the general laborer that worked in the office building ensuring that garbage was picked up, bathrooms stocked and such. He LOVED his job - he was constantly whistling, and had a smile a mile wide. Did he have PASSION for his job? NO. He had passion for his kids, and sports he coached them in and he was HAPPY he had a pay check, so he could give his children a decent life, and also be with them. He was and still is a fantastic employee and happy man. Some people get very demotivated, if they are not doing a job that they are passionate about - but most people are doing a job that they at least like a wee bit, in order to pay the bills, and give them a life they can be happy about. Not all of us are going to be wealthy - but we can all be happy.

Royce
Royce

Rich I enjoyed your thoughts, as usual. I completely agree that there is a kind of anti-corporate 'brainwashing' (for lack of a better term) that goes on with the passion bloggers where they act like there is only one way to be happy with work. Obviously that's not true. It's almost like so many people are telling us to go against the flow that now there are two flows, the original one and the backlash. We have a full-on two-way freeway going here you know? Haha I completely agree that the whole key is enjoying what you're doing to some degree and feeling engaged. At my age (just turned 25, woot) I focus entirely on learning a lot. I learn through work, I learn through doing new things, I learn through books, I learn through talking to people, I learn through blogging connections, etc. I find I'm growing a lot through doing that, so I don't need to feel like my work is some life-fulfilling enterprise right now. When the time comes to make that happen, the maybe I'll re-evaluate, right?

Shane Mac
Shane Mac

I smile and say... Do whatever the heck makes you happy. Nowadays when you can see everything out there don't waste your time doing something you don't like. It is about finding what you don't like to do and moving on. Does that mean being risky? No. Just start talking and building relationships with people while you are in your current job and then if an opportunity arises, take it. I call it True Luck. "Luck is when preparation meets opportunity." - Thomas Jefferson. Most of the time people just feel like they don't know where to look or they just don't know what else is out there. Happens to all of us. You don't know what you don't know. It's called profound ignorance. You have to hear someone's story to give any bit of career advice. This is not general at all. Every person has a unique experience. It takes someone to listen and then point you where to look or how to think about things a little differently. Email me if you want to just talk and maybe we can get you a better job. shane@shanemac.me. Here to help. Shane Mac Passion: "A word that stands for a feeling that people don't know about until they find it." Stop worrying about Passion and start trying new things and passion will show up when you find something you like. P.S. I didn't read this post yet because a lot to do today but I knew what we were talking about and I will swing back later to respond.

Brian Moseley
Brian Moseley

Extremely well put Rich! These are my sentiments exactly, "I’ve been bothered lately by how many people talk smack on the 9-5, and hate on the corporate life. It’s easy to get brainwashed out there with so many bloggers telling you to move away from that lifestyle. The truth of the matter is that I know many happy people who have climbed the corporate ladder, have passion in their corporate career, and are successful in life outside their jobs." I'm one of those guys who is ambitious for a corporate career. There are just aren't as many successful corporate bloggers as there are free-range guys. Great article buddy.

peter lanc
peter lanc

Nice thought! Though if you cannot feel it then you cannot really engage

Caryn
Caryn

Great post. I work in career services at a university and my students are always so stressed out because they haven't found a "passion" so they think they are doomed to be unhappy for the rest of their lives! I try to tell them that passion comes in many forms and in many areas of their lives, and work satisfaction comes in many forms as well. Whether or not they hear me is a different story...!

Jen
Jen

Rich, I liked this post and I happen to agree with you that passion outside of work is far more important. Something else I don't understand is why people want to make their entire life about work. My entire life is about me and what I want to do with my free time. Not about work. Not about money. I realize that young people haven't figured this out yet, but money and working yourself to the bone to have a bunch of "things" to impress people with, that ain't gonna buy you happiness my friend. I tried the whole passion thing. I loved exercise, fitness and helping people. I signed up for ACE training to get certified to be a personal trainer (easy business to get into btw). At first I loved my clients; I loved sharing fitness and healthy goals with them. I loved to see the transformations. I put my entire heart and soul into my work. And I was not in it for the money (though you can make a lot). I was passionate about what I was doing. Until I wasn't. I got burnt out. I got so sick of the gym and working out that I had to quit. I had to go take a desk job somewhere because I couldn't set foot in a gym for months. While I now workout myself for fun and will help my friends on occasion, I could never ever have that passion that I once had for personal training back, because I put way too much of myself into it. It was all I did. It was work, and it was leisure, it became my identity, then it lost its luster. Work is work, but your passion, that should be something you enjoy, not necessarily a means to an end.

Srinivas Rao
Srinivas Rao

Well said Rich. I personally wouldn't have a roof over my head or be able to pay my bills without my current corporate job. To add to that when you have the issue of money handled a bit you get alot more flexibility to work on passion projects and I've been making the time after work and on my off days to do stuff related to all my passions.

JC Hewitt
JC Hewitt

I can only speak for myself in this respect. According to a recent report by Pew Research (http://pewresearch.org/pubs/1501/), 37% of people 18-29 are unemployed. There are few jobs open for young people. The jobs that would be available get undercut by interns supported by parents willing to work for free. There just isn't anything available for someone like me aside from freelancing/consulting and entrepreneurship. I tried working at "real" jobs for crap wages. The moment I began freelancing, I began generating a far higher income than I had any hope to. The kind of writing that I had to do certainly didn't dovetail into my passions, but it *paid,* I learned from it, and I discovered new areas of business that actually excited me. This isn't the case entirely for older people with five years + experience, but the corporate system is a wreck. Some of us watched our parents sacrifice their lives to the corporate world, generated an unsustainable lifestyle around it, and then exploded during the downturn. If this were 1985, I'd be better-disposed to finding corporate work. The sacrifices would appear to be worth it.

John
John

Hey Rich, I completely agree with your feeling on Experience vs. Passion and how it is not necessary to be fully engaged or at least fully satisfied with your job, especially nowadays. Those who find satisfaction, enjoyment and passion in thier jobs are very few, and for the most part, I assume they are mostly Hollywood actors. The trick to finding happiness in your job is comfort. Comfort with the poepl you work with is the most important of these, because even i the job is mundane, or painstaking, you know you're not alone for the most part and you'll have support.

Tony Ruiz
Tony Ruiz

Hey Rich I think the reason people bash on 9-5 so much is because not many people are lucky enough to find that "dream" job that they are passionate about. Bloggers like you are valuable because the people that have the desire to climb the corporate ladder have guidance to find a career they are passionate about. I really enjoyed Gary's book too.

Mehul Kar
Mehul Kar

Yes, experience is greater than passion when someone hires. But wouldn't it be so much better if that experience came from something you were passionate about?

Melissa
Melissa

You are completely right about the importance of experience and talent. Without them, you are sunk. It doesn't matter how much passion you have. Where some of the problem lies in talking about passion is that the need for it is very subjective. It's not "one size fits all." Some can do really well one a small amount of passion for their work, while others need to feel that passion strongly to be satisfied in their job. I'll admit that I've been one who has jumped on the passion bandwagon because it is something that is important for me and for many people I associate with. Thanks for the reminder about individual differences!

Jackie Adkins
Jackie Adkins

"Whatever you gain enjoyment from is what you should be doing in life. Contrary to popular belief, you do not NEED to be absolutely crazy about your job" I'm thinking there are a TON of people who would argue this point all night long with you, but I 100% agree. Sometimes all you need is a job that is flexible enough to allow you to pursue and experience your passion. Sure, I'm one that has chosen to make my career one of my passions, but that's not to say that's the only way of doing it. Just wanted to drop a comment and give some props for you pointing that out. Great post, Rich!

Brian Meeks
Brian Meeks

Great post on Passioin. I love my job, but I still find time to be passionate about my new hobbies, woodworking and blogging about woodworking. Have a job I am passionate and an 'after work' which I am also thrilled with, has made the last 6 months some of the best of my 43 years. Oh and Today is my birthday. I am 43.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Sam - great thoughts here and thanks. Definitely - people can do both, why don't they?

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Walter - I agree. We all have different paths to passion.!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Sam - thanks for the comment/thoughts. Sure, it is certainly hammered into our brains. You don't see the successful happy 9-5'ers complaining much. Sure, some of them do, and some of them leave the 9-5, but many of them are happy with their life and love their life and find success in corporate 9-5 jobs. Social Media folks who spend all day reading blogs and on the computer are forced to buy into passion. As long as people realize they can be happy doing both, and that it's a matter of preference, then I'm OK with the passion parade.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hi Elisa - I think you are right. I'm all for success stories... I mean, they are inspirational, so why not tell them? What I have a problem with, is the brainwashing. Passion is not the only way to manage a career. Just because you like a job that you do, doesn't mean it is your passion. You may love your job because it provides the financial security to carry out your passion outside of work. Thanks for your thoughts and the comment!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hi Darleen - I love your comment, that's a perfect example. Sure, we can all "cash in on our passion", but some people have a passion for simply making money so that they can provide for their kids and family. Thanks for the story, and leaving your thoughts.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Royce - thanks for your thoughts on this. I agree, there are two flows for sure, and it seems that more bloggers go against the Corporate flow. We all want to be different so badly, that we end up the same. Happy belated 25th! You can always go back to re-evaluate, but if you feel you are making progress, then why change anything? If you enjoy your life, then that's all you need to worry about.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Shane - Thanks for the comment. You make good points, but the point of this whole post is just to explain that passion isn't necessary as many people have experienced. You'll enjoy work and do better work, but being in my positions, i've seen many people do amazing work in a job that wasn't their passion. Instead, they had passions outside of work. Certified carer coaches are great people to talk to, and they help point out things that no one thinks about as well.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Brian - Thanks for stopping by Mr. Video master! Many many successful, and happy corporate people who have managed to make tons of money while also living a satisfying life.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

I agree, Peter. I feel that as long as you have an interest in your job and enjoy it a little you will engage. A full out passion is not needed. Many people are money motivated, and are driven by money... Money is their passion. Many people have a passion to work WITH people and that's what will make their job a success. Many people just want to support their family and that is their life passion so if their job allows them to support a family, they will succeed.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Caryn - great comment! Passion comes in many forms for sure. Don't let them get stressed out over their career. It will work out and they will find success in their career and outside of their career. Thanks for the thoughts!

Royce
Royce

Jen I found your story about getting burnt out on the gym and working out very interesting, thanks for sharing! A really good lesson about learning the limits on your passions, and when to make something a hobby versus a life calling... good stuff Hope you enjoy what you're doing now!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Jen, thanks for the comment. I agree with you... I want a lot of money, but that will be to support the future family. I want money to afford fun trips and nice things, so I'll make that happen. I don't need passion in work to have a happy life. It's ideal, but not needed. Interesting how your passion burned you out. That's very very interesting to me! I'm a huge gym rat, and if for some reason I ever hated the gym i'd go nuts. Thanks for bringing this up!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Srini - Perfect example of someone that gets it. You work hard during the day, and whatever you are passionate about at night (passion job, surfing, blogcastfm) you go for it. Thanks for the comment!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hi JC - thanks for your thoughts and coments. Interesting study... I agree that that many people are unemployed and it's rough for sure. With that said, things will get better and freelancing till corporate is open is an option. I disagree with you on the corporate system. Some corps do amazing and have tremendous work places and benefit systmes. Freelancing doesn't take care of those expensive health care bills.... I don't see corporate life as a sacrifice, i see it as the employee USING the employer. No one is loyal. Employees leave after 2-3 years these days and soak up experience, then move on to another company for a higher pay rate. That's how it is.

Gina
Gina

Were you even alive in 1985?? This is the garbage I can't stand and why I stop reading blogs like this. I’m so freakin’ sick and tired of having rich whiney spoiled brats tell me that my traditional 9-5 job is “not good enough”. People have no idea where anyone else has come from or what their dreams and goals are. If you want to do something non-conformist (which if everyone is doing it, wouldn’t that actually make you a conformist???) that is fabulous… go on with your bad self (yeah I’m old). But don’t dare knock what I choose to do in my life. If I choose to work 9-5 and buy a house and spend my weekends reading in my backyard or relaxing at the beach or going to a dinner party that is my business. I’m not less of a person because I didn’t open my own business or do freelance writing. Those things don’t interest me in the least. I just wish these kids would stop thinking that they are doing something different. OH and by the time you kids grow up and out of this phase, you’ll have a 9-5 too, just ask your parents. And one more thing, you are not entitled to make a ton of money when you get out of college and you are supposed to start at the bottom and work your way up, you aren’t supposed to graduate and walk into a company and be the CEO. Grow up people! Do some work like the rest of us had to in order to get to where we are. You sound like a kid at the playground who didn't get exactly what he wanted so he's going take his toys and go play somewhere else. It isn't corporate America that has the problem, it is your attitude and expectations that are.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hi John - thanks for the comment. Good points about engagement and job satisfaction. Working with people that make work fun is absolutely critical. When you work in a shitty job, but have great people there, it forces you to stay. That's something I agree on completely.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Thanks, Tony - that comment was made me feel good about what I'm doing here on COTJ. Bring up a really interesting point about dream jobs. I'm sort of stuck on dream jobs and how it relates to passion, but I see where you are going and I think it's a valid point. Sometimes, I feel like dream jobs are a figment of our imagination. Companies don't keep people anymore and people don't stay, so I sort of feel dream jobs are gone and it's more about moving through each company hoping to expand and build up skills. Gary's book was great, just hope too many people don't get brainwashed.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hi Mehul - Of course. It will always be better, but my opinion is that passion is not NEEDED. It's a nice to have. Some people absolutely need it. Do I love recruiting? Yes. Do I say it's my passion? Probably not. I'm passionate about hockey, health, and family.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Melissa - Sure, it is subjective, but people have lived successfully and happily for years without passion in their lives. I'd much rather have passion in work, but I think I'd rather have passion outside of work. Maybe that doesn't make sense. It's true we spend more time than anything in work, but I don't want my happiness to rely on work passion. Thanks for the comment!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Jackie - thanks for the comment and thoughts on this. I'm a huge believer in passion, but that doesn't mean that passion needs to be at work. It's great if it is, but there are many of millions of people who have worked the 9-5 their whole life and have lived incredibly enjoyable lives. Thanks for pointing out that quote. Think of all the people who have lived and died that weren't working their passion... they loved their lives. I just don't want to see hundreds of thousands of new grads stressing about finding their passion, when there is much more to life than work.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey Brian - First of all, happy birthday! Second of all, glad to see you have some interesting hobbies. People talk so much about passion, but it truly isn't needed to be happy in life, or even like/love your job. Thanks for the comment!

Sam Diener
Sam Diener

Well it's very true. There are plenty of 9-5ers very happy in what they are doing. I think psychologically, people just want to know that they are doing something important. What is important to each person varies. I think a lot of us bash on the 9-5 because we haven't found a 9-5 that well fulfills our need at a higher level. Sam

Shane Mac
Shane Mac

I like day job. Would rather sail the world and drink beer all day. Couldn't fund my life without day job. There are millions of day jobs. If you hate yours, find another. Business is so damn easy and people like to make their job seem hard. Unless you are an investment banker or some crazy algorithms, all of these other titles like marketing manager, HR, Project Manager, VP, Manager, Business Development, etc... are not science. We like to make ourselves think that what we do is hard so people will think they have so much to learn. Just start doing it.

Brian Meeks
Brian Meeks

Great Comment Gina!!! I had a Corporate job which I loved, working as a data analyst at GEICO. They are a great company and the people who worked there were a delight. I chose to go out on my own, because I wanted to see if I could. It has been fun too. There can be joy in any job, but Corporate jobs have the added bonus of working with lots of wonderful people, being able to help a team, and to be promoted. I don't think the people that bash 'Corporate' have ever stopped to look at all the wonderful aspects, they are too busy being angry at everything.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Gina - great comments, love the PASSION you put into this comment. Many Gen Y folks feel they are entitled to go make a ton of money just because they have "passion" i agree. 9-5's are amazing, I'm a proponent of them. People automatically assume they are the wrong way to go without being open to the idea that corporate life can be a beautiful thing. Thanks for your thoughts!

CZ
CZ

Wow! I needed to read this today! Thank you, thank you, thank you! I'm 29, I work at the same 9-5 (5:30, actually) job I've had since finishing grad school five years ago, doing something I kind of "fell into" (my grad degree is research-based and could be applied to a variety of fields). It is not my passion, the commute wears on me at times, and the job has plenty of frustrations. But, it pays well, I have great benefits and the flexibility to make appointments when I need to, I get to travel occasionally to client sites, I've earned the respect of my superiors, and ultimately I don't hate what I'm doing. Still, I've spent the past 6 months or so feeling like I'm missing out on some big "aha" realization in life because what I do isn't my passion, and my schedule is conventional. I've felt almost like a bit of a slacker for not doing everything I can to bust through that convention, like I'm some how less imporant, or just passively living my life. But thing is, as much as I strive to do well in my work, and enjoy reading career-oriented blogs for insight and strategies, it's not because my work is my passion. It's because I want to earn money, so I have the freedom, flexibility, and options my working-class parents never had. And really - is that so unreasonable? I'm passionate about animals, natural health and fitness, and my relationships - none of which offer strong prospects of a more comfortable lifestyle than I grew up with. And that's the thing that people so often overlook: to even consider taking the risks that so many of the Gen Y (mostly) anti-9-to-5-ers speak so highly of, one must come from a place of relative affluence to begin with. A young person with student loan debt, or who doesn't have the safety net of parental support to fall back on, isn't likely to choose a freelance "might make $30K/year" lifestyle over a $60K/year corporate gig. Fact is, we all have to pay the rent! It's one thing to choose to shift gears once you've attained a level of relative financial comfort, but it's another entirely to suggest that in order for today's new grads to find meaning in their life, that they should be constructing meaningful careers - and the only way to have a meaningful career is to reject the conventional 9-5 schedule/lifestyle. To me it would seem that those kinds of options are limited to a very thin slice of people. Excellent post. I'm passing it on to some friends.

Brian Meeks
Brian Meeks

Thanks for the Birthday Wishes. It was a lovely day, the weather was nice here in Iowa and I had a wonderful dinner with my parents. :-) I am glad you are getting some good responses to your blog post. The comments are wonderful.

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Sam - don't know what's up with your avatar, that's so weird! Good point about not finding the right 9-5. I've loved my corporate jobs... I loved recruiting. Is it right for me forever, i don't know... was it my passion? Maybe not. But it paid me and i liked the company and people, so it worked.

Sam Diener
Sam Diener

Oh - and where is my avatar? Sam

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

I agree and disagree with this comment, Shane. People do make their jobs harder than they seem, but some jobs are really hard jobs and it's more than just saying "it's not science". Take a product manager who works in the Pharma Veritcal. For that person, it really is science. They need to understand everything about that industry in order to sell their companys services to the pharma industry. Point is - there are many jobs that are extremely difficult. My last job wasn't science, but it was certainly difficult. Being responsible for the hiring of 100 jobs across the country, for all disciplines of business was challenging. I did the work, located talent, and didn't complain much, but it was still a very hard, challenging job. Was it my passion? I don't know about that, but I loved my job. That's what I'm saying about 9-5. There is no need to have passion if you like the job. Passion is just a buzz word. I'm passionate about great food and good people. Does that mean I should become a chef? Maybe... Thanks for your comments!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Brian you make a great point about promotions. Some people have a simple passion for being recognized, and one way is through promotions and raises. In startups or passion, that's not always there. Thanks for adding value to this post, Brian!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Hey CZ - I love your comment. Thanks for bringing all of this up! Please, don't feel like you are missing something, unless you are sure that passion is what you need to do with work, then don't sweat it. If your passion is hobbies and activities outside of work, then go for it and make the $$$ you need to support those activities. I agree with you on coming from money to enjoy solely passions. Some people work corporate jobs, and then work passion jobs at night. That's OK too, but some people can't do it that way. Thanks for passing on to your friends, hope you'll subscribe to the blog and send me suggestions for future pieces you'd like to read!

Rich DeMatteo
Rich DeMatteo

Glad all is well out there in Iowa, Brian. The comments from you folks is what keeps me writing. Without the comment and discussion, do I have a reason to write? Thanks!